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Recent Articles

Photographing the Human-Animal Bond

Filed in Tips by on February 4, 2016 0 Comments
Photographing the Human-Animal Bond

If you share your home with a dog, cat or other furry creature, then you know that being a pet owner is about more than just caring for a non-human animal. We love our pets, and they love us. Animals are a part of our families.

So when you take pictures of your dog or cat, how often do you try to capture some of the love between your furry friend and your other family members? It’s one thing to take a beautiful portrait of your cat sitting next to the window or an action shot of your dog chasing a ball in the backyard, but what do these photos really say about your pet’s place in your family? Read on to find out more about capturing those people-pet moments. Continue Reading »

Using Vertical Lines in Your photography

Filed in Tips by on February 4, 2016 0 Comments
Using Vertical Lines in Your photography

I know you’ve heard a lot about diagonal lines, and how they can be used to add depth and dimension to a photograph. Diagonal lines are wonderful because they act as arrows, drawing your viewer’s eye into a scene and encouraging it to spend some time looking around. But what about vertical lines? What do they do for your photographs? Keep reading to find out. Continue Reading »

Making a Statement: How to use your camera to protest and express your opinion

Filed in Tips by on February 4, 2016 0 Comments
Making a Statement: How to use your camera to protest and express your opinion

Everyone’s got an opinion. Some of us are more passionate about certain subjects than others, some of us complain about the state of the nation and its politics in the privacy of our own home, while others say it out loud and proud. If you’re the sort who has a lot of complaints and observations about the world at large but would rather mumble those complaints and observations under your breath rather than start a confrontation, why not make a quiet but profound statement with your camera? Read on to find out how. Continue Reading »

Six Ways to Beat Photographer’s Block

Filed in Tips by on January 28, 2016 0 Comments
Six Ways to Beat Photographer’s Block

Have you ever stared blankly at your camera, just waiting for a flash of inspiration? Have you ever racked your brain for some new idea about what to go photograph, but just couldn’t come up with anything? Maybe you found the whole experience so disheartening that you put your camera back in its bag and switched on your favorite TV show instead.

This is called photographers block, and it happens to everyone who owns a camera. So how do you beat it? Continue Reading »

How to Avoid Burned-Out Highlights

Filed in Tips by on January 28, 2016 0 Comments
How to Avoid Burned-Out Highlights

With very few exceptions, every photograph needs to have shadows and highlights. Defined, a shadow is an area that contains true blacks, and a highlight is an area that contains true whites. It sounds simple, but you probably already know that there’s an art to capturing those highlights and shadows. You can have true blacks in your photograph, but that doesn’t mean that they’re good shadows. And you can have true whites in your photograph, too, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they are good highlights. How do you know the difference? Read on to find out. Continue Reading »

Using Horizontal Lines in Your Photography

Filed in Tips by on January 28, 2016 1 Comment
Using Horizontal Lines in Your Photography

Diagonal lines lead the eye, vertical lines imply strength, height and majesty, now what about horizontal lines? We use horizontal lines in our photography probably more than we even realize. Almost every landscape photograph has a horizontal line, or at least an implied horizontal line—and that’s the horizon. But you can find horizontal lines in other places too, and you can use them to create different moods and emotions in your photos. Keep reading to find out how. Continue Reading »

Making the Switch to RAW

Filed in Tips by on January 21, 2016 4 Comments
Making the Switch to RAW

If you’re like a lot of beginners, you probably don’t think a whole lot about file formats. After all, we live in a world of JPEG. Most of the images that we see online are JPEGs. Most of the images that family and friends forward to us in emails are JPEGs. And for the most part, our cameras shoot JPEG by default. In fact it’s possible you don’t even really understand what a JPEG is, and that’s okay, because most people don’t really have cause to even think about it. You take some photos, you upload them to your favorite photo processing service, you order prints and they arrive in your mailbox. Why mess with a system that isn’t broken? Would it surprise you to hear that the system kind of is broken, if you think about it? Read on to find out why.
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How to Photograph Traffic

Filed in Tips by on January 21, 2016 0 Comments
How to Photograph Traffic

Ah, yes the joys of traffic. If you have ever lived in a big city or have just passed through one you know the feeling – that sinking feeling of knowing you’re nowhere near your destination, and are not likely to get there any time soon. If only there was a way to make traffic more interesting. Well guess what? There is. How about making it a photography subject? Keep reading to find out more.
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How to Shoot Through Glass

Filed in Tips by on January 21, 2016 2 Comments
How to Shoot Through Glass

There are lots of things that we photographers have to work around. One of those things is bad light. Another one is reflections. Have you ever tried to shoot a subject that is behind a piece of glass? If you have, you know what I’m talking about. Reflections, glare, even dirty fingerprints can all get in the way of creating a gorgeous picture, even if you’re 100 percent sure that a gorgeous picture lies just beyond that piece of glass.
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Light Graffiti

Filed in Tips by on January 15, 2016 0 Comments
Light Graffiti

One of my favorite things to do when I’m stuck in a creative rut is this: I make graffiti.

Now just in case you think I’m advocating buying some spray paint and vandalizing a few walls for fun and creative inspiration, that’s not the kind of graffiti I’m talking about. I’m talking about the kind of graffiti that doesn’t have to be painted over or otherwise removed by an unhappy shopkeeper. I’m talking about the kind of graffiti you can create with light. It’s easy and fun, and here’s how to do it.
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How to Photograph Shiny Objects

Filed in Tips by on January 15, 2016 0 Comments
How to Photograph Shiny Objects

In so many ways, indoor, tabletop photography is ideal for beginners. There are a ton of advantages to shooting photos inside your own home, using controlled light and objects that can’t move on their own or protest. Taking photos indoors in your own tabletop studio is a great way to teach yourself about light without the encumbrances of time or the pressures associated with photographing living subjects. Read on for my tips.
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How to Photograph Fast Action

Filed in Tips by on January 15, 2016 2 Comments
How to Photograph Fast Action

Over the years, I’ve spent a lot of time talking with beginning photographers, and in all of that time I would say that one of the biggest disappointments for people who are new to their cameras and the art of taking photos is failure to capture action shots well. This can be particularly crushing for parents and other people who want to capture fast action photos of events that are meaningful to them personally. I don’t have to tell you that when your child scores the winning touchdown in the final game of the season, that’s a moment that can never be repeated. Once it’s gone, it’s gone, and until someone actually invents a Tardis, your only real option is to poll the other parents to see if someone else got the photo. What to do? Keep reading for some foolproof tips.
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Out of Focus – Deliberately!

Filed in Tips by on January 8, 2016 3 Comments
Out of Focus – Deliberately!

When you first learned to take pictures, you were given a very useful piece of advice. You were told that blurry photos are bad, and sharp photos are good. And even today you probably look at those words and think to yourself, “Yes, that is a mighty good piece of advice”.

It does seem pretty fundamental, but on second thought – pretty much everything you’ve heard about photography thus far implies that there really aren’t any unbreakable rules. You can even bust through the rule of thirds when you have a good reason to. You can underexpose on purpose and you can overexpose on purpose, and you can do all of those things with excellent results. So that “keep your subject in focus” rule might not necessarily be unbreakable, either.
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How to Take Beautiful Black and White Photos

Filed in Tips by on January 8, 2016 0 Comments
How to Take Beautiful Black and White Photos

If you started your photographic life during the digital era, you may not have a whole lot of familiarity with black and white photography. But back in the old days, anyone taking photography classes always learned first in black and white. Black and white film was easy to develop and print, and it did a very good job of teaching students about things like light, contrast, form and texture. So can you still get great black and white photos with a digital camera? Absolutely! Keep reading to find out how.
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How to Photograph Marinas, Boardwalks and Piers

Filed in Tips by on January 8, 2016 0 Comments
How to Photograph Marinas, Boardwalks and Piers

When you think of seascapes, you probably think of long, sandy beaches, beautiful rock formations and the crashing surf. And it’s certainly true that most people don’t get tired of these scenes, no matter how samey they may be. There’s something about the ocean that inspires us, and any ocean lover will tell you that there’s just nothing boring about the sea.

But it’s probably also true that if you spend a lot of time photographing the ocean, you start to wish for a little variety. You can find that by looking for places where the ocean collides with civilization – like marinas, boardwalks and piers. But there’s a trick to capturing both the wild and civilized faces of these locations – keep reading to find out how.
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