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Critiques

Photography Critiquing: Giving And Getting Advice On Your Photography

Photography Critiquing: Giving And Getting Advice On Your Photography

One of the best ways to get better at taking pictures is to get involved in it with your friends. Critiquing one another’s work often gives you a perspective on your own photography that you might not have considered before. As creators, we often get so invested in what we’re doing that we fail to see the little (or sometimes big) things that can make or break a photo. If a friend can point this out to us in a tactful way, it can lead to some major improvements in our work.
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Photo Critique: How To Make Your Baby Portraits Come Alive

Photo Critique: How To Make Your Baby Portraits Come Alive

Yvonne Day sent in this wonderful little portrait, and there are so many things I love about it. From the expressive smile to the soft pastels and bright background, this photo is everything a parent could want from a baby portrait. Yvonne even got the catchlights and the focus on the eyes just right! I wouldn’t change a thing about this photo.
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Photo Critique: How To Get Lush Green Landscape Photos

Photo Critique: How To Get Lush Green Landscape Photos

We’ve been talking a lot about what makes a landscape photo truly come alive lately. For those who haven’t been tuning in, there are several important elements that, when put together, give the viewer a true sense of scale and purpose. Whenever you can find something the viewer can relate to, you will undoubtedly create a compelling landscape photo. That’s what this next photo critique is all about.
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Photo Critique: No Rest For The Weary

Photo Critique: No Rest For The Weary

It’s time to critique your work, and this week I am happy to switch it up again and get back to wildlife photography. The following rare shot was sent in by Tony Thundal from Denmark. He managed to capture this telling moment with his Nikon D90 in aperture priority mode with an aperture of F5.6 and a shutter speed of 1/250s. The lens he used is a Nikkor 18-200 VR II, presumably shot somewhere in the telephoto range.
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Photo Critique: Macro on a Point-And-Shoot

Photo Critique: Macro on a Point-And-Shoot

With as much discussion as we have been having about the difference between point-and-shoot cameras and DSLRs lately, it is only appropriate to continue our theme and explore some more pictures you can easily take with a point-and-shoot camera. A lot of people think that because they do not have a macro lens mounted on a DSLR, they can’t take good macro photos. This simply isn’t true. If you have a miniature tripod and an eye for framing your shot, you can create some amazing macro photos without owning a macro-specific lens.
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Photo Critique: A Point-And-Shoot Sunset

Photo Critique: A Point-And-Shoot Sunset

This week, I challenged you to deliver some of the best point-and-shoot photos you could muster with your setup. The entire purpose of doing this is to convince you all that you do not need a high end camera to have an eye for photography and to produce great work. This photo, sent in by Clifford Spangler, is one such example. He told me he used “a 2002 Nikon Coolpix 4300 that is being held together with tape” to take it. It’s no less than impressive and a great reason for you to spend more time taking pictures and less time worrying about your next camera setup.
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Photo Critique: Flying In Formation

Photo Critique: Flying In Formation

There has been a lot of recent talk about digital SLR cameras, lens modifications, and whether you need to go out and get a digital SLR right away. Sometimes the best arguments for getting the most out of your point-and-shoot system come from seeing what can be done with them. Usually, this is enough to convince people that the art of photography is not in the camera but the person behind it. This week’s photo critique is centered around that idea. What can and cannot be captured with a point-and-shoot camera? The answer: Almost everything can. It just takes a little more time and a quicker eye.
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Photo Critique: The Jumper

Photo Critique: The Jumper

Last week, I did a two article series on how to create a composite sequence photo with a digital SLR camera and some photo manipulation software. I have received some excellent examples of photo sequences, and I would like to share and critique one of them with you. The following image was sent by Jack Bivins, and it is a prime example of an action sequence. You get a true sense of motion and a subject who is visibly thrilled to be jumping over 30 feet into the deep blue.
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Photo Critique: Out On A Limb

Photo Critique: Out On A Limb

This week, we are treated to a photo taken by Stephen Miller. Stephen describes the picture as a “lucky shot,” and indeed it is. Photographing wild birds can be incredibly difficult, especially because they move so darned fast and they spend a lot of time in the air. While it’s sometimes good to have a picture of a wild bird in mid-flight, these pictures usually don’t have enough reference points to tell a story. Stephen’s picture is the rare instance in which a photo of a single moving bird can maintain a viewer’s interest.
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Photo Critique: An Evening in Riga

Photo Critique: An Evening in Riga

It’s always a good idea to critique photos and to have one’s own photos critiqued. You don’t need to be a professional photographer to develop an eye for great photography. You just need to sit back and think about what appeals to you in a photo. Oftentimes, this is some combination of color balance, composition, and subject matter. True photography magic happens when all three come together perfectly.
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Photo Critique: A Dusting

Photo Critique: A Dusting

Photographers often learn by example. None of us who get deep enough into this hobby have made it where we are today without seeing something we like and taking note of it. Good techniques are copied and put to use in future photos. That’s why it’s important to step back and critique our work and the work of others. The more we notice what we like and don’t like about certain photos, the better we get at creating more of what we love.
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Photo Critique: Stepping Over The Rainbow

Photo Critique: Stepping Over The Rainbow

Critiquing your own photos and those of others is a great way to improve as a photographer. You will really start to understand the important concepts of composition, color balance, and subject matter when you discover how other people use them. A truly great photo always has these three elements working in its favor. Let’s have a look at how the next photo brings it all together.
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More Photo Reviews

More Photo Reviews

Professional reviews of photos are one of the best ways to improve your photographic skills. By studing what works and doesn’t work, you learn to shoot more ‘winners’ yourself.

Curtis Routh has kindly agreed to review the following photos for me. Curtis runs a photography business called LeaveTheCamera.com and his insights are very valued. Click on the photos to comment on the image, or rate it yourself.
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