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How to Bracket without Auto-Bracketing

How to Bracket without Auto-Bracketing

Our cameras are wonderful tools. They can measure the available light and use that information to make a good guess about what settings are required to get the highlights, shadows and everything in between pretty close to the way it was in real life. As photographers, we rely on our cameras and metering system to do this job – without those metering systems, we’d have to use our eyes and brains to figure out the right shutter speed and aperture combination.

But here’s the thing: all that wonderful technology still isn’t good enough to guarantee perfect results every single time. Your camera does a pretty good job of most of the time But it can’t account for all those different variations in light that might happen in unusual situations.

That’s where bracketing can work well. Today, we’ll look at bracketing, why it works, and how you can bracket your own images without needing to let the camera do it.
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Ask David: What camera settings should I use on a sunny day?

Ask David: What camera settings should I use on a sunny day?

When you are photographing during the sunniest part of the day you are combating two major issues: The first is overexposure and the second is harsh shadows.

First, let’s tackle overexposure. Overexposure occurs when too much light gets into your camera and washes out your photo. To combat overexposure, it’s best to shoot in full manual mode because it will give you the most control. As you adjust each setting, keep an eye on your light meter. It’s going to give you a ballpark as you change your settings and will be your first indication if your shot is going be overexposed.
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How to Correctly Expose Your Photo For Any Scene

How to Correctly Expose Your Photo For Any Scene

Getting the correct exposure of an image is easy. Or is it? When you talk about ‘Exposure’, people will have differing opinions regarding the matter. Most often when the subject is brought up with new photographers, the opinions will always be subjective in nature. In a way, the subject of exposure really is subjective and it leaves a lot of room for the artistic interpretation of the photographer. But if we delve deeper into the topic, exposure is more than that. ‘Correct Exposure’ is capturing the image with all the relevant details found in both the shadows and the highlights.

How many times have we taken an image and all we see are all black shadows and not a hint of a detail hiding in them? Or perhaps washing out the details of a cloud and just producing a white sky? Sometimes an image may turn out alright and look good visually. But in most cases, if the image was exposed properly, showing tiny details in the shadows or revealing more information in the highlights, it turns out to be outstanding!
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High Burst Rate Explained

High Burst Rate Explained

Have you ever attempted to take photos of a fast moving subject and failed miserably? Sometimes the moment you release the shutter is not quite the moment you actually wanted to capture. An advantage of a DSLR over a point and shoot is the quick reaction of the shutter to your finger. Even with responsive shutter release it is not always quick or timely enough to get the most important shot. You may snap away only to realize you barely missed the game winning goal. Wouldn’t it be nice to increase your odds of getting a great shot? Using high burst rate mode is a way to take multiple shots with one push of a button, improving your odds of nailing it.
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Shooting in Burst Mode

Shooting in Burst Mode

If you learned how to take photos on an old fashioned SLR camera, complete with $8-per-roll Kodak film (not counting processing fees), then the idea of shooting in burst mode (called “motor drive” in those days) was probably terrifying. Unless, of course, you had financial backing from the newspaper you were working for, or a wildly successful photography business, or maybe you just inherited a small fortune from a wealthy uncle and could afford to burn film.

Lucky for us modern digital photographers, the days where lots of shots meant lots of money are gone. Today most DSLRs (and many point and shoots, too) can shoot in burst mode, which means you can increase your chances of capturing that amazing shot without having to spend your inheritance on film.
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Photographic Exposure Explained

Photographic Exposure Explained

Exposure can be defined as the process of capturing light with your camera to produce an image on the digital sensor. Basically, this is how much light gets into your camera. Each of us has had the experience of taking pictures only to find that they are very dark or way too light. This is caused by incorrect exposure. Today, let’s talk about exposure, what it means to be overexposed and underexposed, and how to achieve proper exposure.
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Three Photography Basics

Three Photography Basics

In the days before point and shoot cameras – back when SLR cameras didn’t have any automatic features at all, everyone who wanted to take photographs had to understand the basic principles of exposure. Film was expensive and you just couldn’t afford to waste a shot on a guess, so you had to really understand how your camera functioned and what settings you needed to use to ensure a correct exposure.

Today we have the great luxury of the “auto” setting, and because of that a lot of us have gotten lazy. So lazy, in fact, that there are some people who love photography, own DSLRs and consider themselves to be photographers on at least some level that still don’t understand those very basic principles of exposure. And for those of us who do have a basic understanding, a quick review is never a bad thing. Ready?
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Which is best? Spot, Center Weight, or Matrix metering?

Which is best? Spot, Center Weight, or Matrix metering?

Metering is one of those subjects that makes hobby photographers put their hands over their ears and sing “la la la, I can’t hear you.” That’s because metering is a bit of a complicated subject. After all, who wants to talk about the way your camera estimates exposure? Shouldn’t that stuff happen behind the scenes, so the photographer can focus on important stuff, like composition?

It’s true that many point and shoot cameras – especially the inexpensive ones – have a fixed metering system that doesn’t give you any control over how the meter analyzes light and chooses an exposure. But that doesn’t mean that it’s not important to understand how to use the different metering modes, if your camera offers them. With just a little bit of effort you’ll discover just how useful switching between metering modes can actually be.
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Why Don’t You Tell Us Which Settings To Use?

Why Don’t You Tell Us Which Settings To Use?

Hey guys. I just want to start by thanking you so much for your feedback on all of my articles. I’m excited that they’re helping you out as much you say they are. Over the last few years, I’ve gotten a bunch of fairly common questions. More than one of you has wondered why I don’t give out specific camera settings in my articles. By that I mean telling you exactly which aperture, shutter speed, or ISO speed setting to use to get a certain photo. Hopefully I can clear things up by explaining why I can’t do that. Rather than just being a nay-sayer, I’ll also tell you how YOU can find the appropriate camera settings to use for your photos.
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The Sunny 16 Rule

The Sunny 16 Rule

Have you ever heard of the sunny 16 rule? It seems to have all but disappeared in most modern discussions of photography. As a matter of fact, it’s one of many rules that photographers seem to have forgotten. That’s a shame because the sunny 16 rule serves as a nice way to check your current exposure settings. Let’s have a look at how it works.
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What is A-DEP on a Canon camera, and how do I use it?

What is A-DEP on a Canon camera, and how do I use it?

Here’s the predicament. You’re taking a picture of your family in a dimly lit room, and you want everyone in the shot to appear completely in focus. If you use the highest f-number aperture available, you know you’ll be able to get the shot just right, but there’s a problem with that. It might make your photo turn out dark. Is there a way to solve this problem? Let’s have a look at Canon’s solution.
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Why Use Auto Exposure Lock?

Why Use Auto Exposure Lock?

Here’s a handy one for you point-and-shoot photographers. Have you ever wanted to get one part of the scene just right, but you could never get the colors to pop out? Sometimes you know more about the thing you want to photograph than your camera does. You know you want the sky to be blue, really blue, but your camera assumes you want everything to have equal importance. How can you put an end to this? Auto exposure lock, that’s how.
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The Photographer’s Trinity: Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO

The Photographer’s Trinity: Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO

The Photography Trinity are three aspects of photography that go hand in hand: the aperture, the shutter speed, and ISO. Whenever you make a change to one, you have to make a change to the others in order to balance everything out. In this tip, we’ll have a look at how all of this comes together to create the perfect image.
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How To Get The Perfect White Balance Every Time

How To Get The Perfect White Balance Every Time

When it comes to getting accurate colors, nothing is better than nailing your white balance settings right on the head. If the white balance is even slightly off,it can produce a highly noticeable bluish or reddish tinge. Sometimes the tinge is desirable. It can enhance the appeal of clouds or night time photography. But if you’re going for accuracy, you’ll want the perfect white balance settings for the situation you’re shooting in. Pay attention because l’m about to show you how to strike the right balance (literally speaking) by using your camera’s manual white balance settings.
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How to Correctly Expose An Image

How to Correctly Expose An Image

Exposure is everything in photography. If your images are too bright or too dark, you lose a lot of the information and contrast that makes a good image worth viewing. You may have heard me talking about exposure before, but now it’s time to go into more detail. There is a way to ensure that every picture you take is correctly exposed. In this tutorial, I’ll show you how.
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