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Post Processing

How to enhance fall colors in post-processing

Filed in General Post, Tips by on September 21, 2017 0 Comments
How to enhance fall colors in post-processing

If you ask me, autumn is one of the best times of the year for photography. You just don’t get such a beautiful range of vibrant colors at any other time of the year. Spring comes close, but even in the spring those vibrant colors just aren’t as omnipresent as they are in the autumn, when every deciduous tree and the ground beneath it is overflowing with brilliant yellows, oranges and reds.
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What is Auto HDR?

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What is Auto HDR?

Modern digital cameras can do a lot of things that their predecessors even as recently as 10 years ago could not do, but they’re still not perfect. And one of the challenges that digital photography manufacturers have always faced is producing cameras that are capable of capturing a full range of tones in a high dynamic range situation. Even today, the best DSLRs on the market still can’t achieve this in every situation. But there’s good news—many newer model cameras have an automatic mode designed to combat this problem. It’s called “Auto HDR,” but just what does it do and more importantly, should you use it? Keep reading to find out.
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Light Graffiti

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Light Graffiti

One of my favorite things to do when I’m stuck in a creative rut is this: I make graffiti.

Now just in case you think I’m advocating buying some spray paint and vandalizing a few walls for fun and creative inspiration, that’s not the kind of graffiti I’m talking about. I’m talking about the kind of graffiti that doesn’t have to be painted over or otherwise removed by an unhappy shopkeeper. I’m talking about the kind of graffiti you can create with light. It’s easy and fun, and here’s how to do it.
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What is Dynamic Range (and why should I care)

What is Dynamic Range (and why should I care)

If you’ve been taking digital photographs for any length of time, you have probably heard the phrase “dynamic range.” It’s one of those phrases that other photographers use under the assumption that everyone knows what it means, even though most beginning photographers have at best a rudimentary understanding of it.

Dynamic range as it pertains to photography has something to do with light and something to do with camera technology, and understanding what those somethings are can really help you improve your photography, especially while you are in the learning stages. So why is it that no one has ever really told you what dynamic range is, and why you should care? Because it’s so fundamental that those old timers just assume its like breathing. Except of course that it’s not.

What is dynamic range and why is it important? Keep reading to find out. Continue Reading »

How To Fix Chromatic Aberration?

How To Fix Chromatic Aberration?

If you’ve been taking photographs for long enough, you’ve probably heard of chromatic aberration. It actually goes by a couple of different names. The first one, “chromatic aberration” is the technical term. It seems a bit overly-technical, really, as if it’s just meant to make beginners scratch their heads. The second name for chromatic aberration is quite the opposite. “Purple fringing” sounds like something you might find on the sleeves of a jacket from the 1960s, not like something that has anything to do with photography. So if you are confused about chromatic aberration or purple fringing, keep reading. A little explanation will go along way.
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Zoom Blur Effect In Camera

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Zoom Blur Effect In Camera

Tired of the same old shots? Want to add a cool effect without any post processing? Zoom blur may be just the ticket. With just your DSLR and a kit lens, you can take some creative photos that break the traditional mold. Use this fun technique to produce unique results and enhance your portfolio. Zoom on!
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Using the Levels Tool in Photoshop Elements

Using the Levels Tool in Photoshop Elements

Do you use the brightness and contrast sliders in Photoshop Elements to correct photos with poor contrast or flat tones? Stop that immediately! Those brightness and contrast sliders are really pretty limited compared to what you can do with the levels tool. The Levels tool is a hugely useful tool for all photographers, and today I’ll show you how to use it!
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What is Light Painting?

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What is Light Painting?

Have you ever seen one of those wedding pictures where the happy newlyweds used sparklers to spell out their date? This is called light painting. Light painting is the use of a slow shutter speed and a light source to create or enhance a photograph. This process allows you to use light in a similar manner as you would a paint brush. Using your camera and a light source, you can create a completely new photograph or add emphasis to an established scene. Here’s all the light painting information you need to illuminate yourself.
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Break the Focus Rule

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Break the Focus Rule

Ah, the focus rule. That’s the one that you learned first. You probably learned it the first time you picked up a camera, even if it was just a point and shoot that didn’t actually give you the ability to control the focus. You remember, your mom looked at your pictures and said, “Oh, that’s so cute, shame it isn’t in focus”.

It really is the first thing we learn as photographers: focus, shoot.

But like every other so-called “rule” of photography, it isn’t completely unbreakable. Sometimes an out-of-focus photograph can be better than an in-focus shot of the same subject. But when?
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What is Lomography?

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What is Lomography?

If you own a DSLR camera, you’re probably at least a little bit of a techie. You love that high ISO capability, the aperture-priority setting and those beautiful, high-resolution images that can be blown up to poster size without any discernible loss of quality. You probably can’t remember how to load a roll of film (if you ever knew how to at all) and you think a dark room is what happens when the power goes out.
If that’s you, it might be time to get back to your roots. Because while there aren’t very many people who would say that all that high-tech is a bad thing, sometimes a little low-tech can be good for you.

Now you can dig out that old film camera or you can try something even more low-tech: lomography. Wow, that sounds kind of high-tech. So what IS lomography?
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How To Photograph A Ghost

How To Photograph A Ghost

Confession: I have never photographed a real ghost. So this tutorial is not going to help you stake out a haunted house or a cemetery, or advise you on which expensive piece of equipment you’ll need to buy in order to detect subtle changes in the inter-dimensional paranormal space-time continuum other-side.

The good news is, fake ghosts are a lot more agreeable than real ones. You don’t have to worry that your fake ghost is going to go floating off through a wall, leaving nothing but a puddle of ecto-plasmic goo behind for you to slip in. Fake ghosts do what you tell them to do, because they’re fake. That makes photographing them infinitely more enjoyable, and a lot less scary.
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Camera Shake: Not Just For Deleting Anymore

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Camera Shake: Not Just For Deleting Anymore

Modern photographers love to push the envelope of all those old-school philosophies. Lens flare? Love it. Severe overexposure? Kind of cool. Camera shake? Awesome.

Wait, camera shake? Isn’t that the reason why you bought that oh-so expensive but light, sturdy and portable tripod? So you could avoid camera shake?

Let me backtrack just a second. Camera shake is still mostly bad, most of the time. You don’t want camera shake messing up your long-exposure landscape image or that fabulous photo of the spinning fairground ride. You don’t want it to mess up the clarity of any image that you intended to be, well, clear. But there are certain instances where camera shake can be used for creative effect. Most of the time (but not all the time) this is an intentional decision on the part of you, the photographer. So when is camera shake actually a good thing?
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Abstract Photography For Beginners

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Abstract Photography For Beginners

Photography as an art is usually based on your viewer looking at all the parts of a photograph and forming meaning based on their world experiences. Abstract photography removes the parameters of context. So it frees you to create the meaning you wish to convey… so your viewer will be able to look at something in a completely new light. Abstract photography is the art of stripping away and stripping down. It helps to have a keen eye for detail and the ability to see an object (often a common everyday item) as its individual parts rather than the whole. Abstract photography is a challenge but there are some basic tips to get you started off in the right direction.
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The art of Freelensing

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The art of Freelensing

As photographers and in turn artists, we are constantly searching for new ways to invigorate our art and revitalize our passion for it. Sometimes this need to create something new and different causes us to try out unconventional and potentially ill-advised methods. Freelensing is one of these sometimes applauded, sometimes frowned upon practices which provides visually interesting photographs that are hard to recreate in any other fashion. But it also has its risks….
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How To: Toss your Camera

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How To: Toss your Camera

OK, first of all, don’t try this. There. Now I’ll tell you how to try the thing you’re not going to try. It’s camera tossing, and it can create some really cool, abstract images. And also destroy your camera. So don’t do it, seriously. Unless you want to. But please keep in mind that I told you not to.

Yes, camera tossing is something that should be done at your own risk, because it’s exactly what it sounds like. You’re going to take your camera and throw it into the air, and then hopefully catch it again. This can (and probably will, if you do it enough times) cause great damage to your camera, but the results might be worth it.
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