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Cropping

Cropping 101

Cropping 101

Whether you have years of experience or are a newbie to digital photography, cropping is one of the most basic editing tools you can use to improve the look of your pictures. Ideally you will compose your picture with the subject where you want them, an appealing background, etc. Now try that while chasing your two-year-old around the yard trying to capture the perfect shot! Sometimes you are lucky to even get your subject in the frame, let alone have them ideally situated. Never fear, some simple cropping rules and techniques can greatly enhance the appeal of your edited image. I will give you a few simple suggestions for cropping your pictures – most of which can be done with even the most basic of photo editing software.
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Crop or resize? What happens when you pick a lower pixel count setting

Crop or resize? What happens when you pick a lower pixel count setting

Sometimes it helps to select a lower pixel count when taking a photo. It helps to reduce file size, allowing you to take a long continuous stream of photos or simply store more on your memory card. But what happens to the image when you do this? Does the camera crop the image, or does the image simply get resized?
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How To Correct Sloping Horizons

How To Correct Sloping Horizons

If you haven’t mastered the perfect camera grip quite yet, your photos of ordinary buildings can start to look like the Leaning Tower Of Pisa pretty quickly. With sloping horizons, something always feel just a little bit “off” about your photos. Luckily, there’s a way to change that in short order. With a few simple editing tools like Photoshop, you can quickly straighten out your leaning photos and get back to working on that iron camera grip of yours.
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How to Crop Your Digital Photo for Printing

How to Crop Your Digital Photo for Printing

If this isn’t a huge disappointment, please tell me what isn’t. You get a bunch of your point and shoot pictures printed, only to find out that the top and bottom of every photo has been completely cut off. As you stare at the faces and scenes chopped in half, you’re wondering what could have caused this and whether it is your fault as a photographer. Well worry no more. There is a perfectly reasonable explanation, and it has nothing to do with an error on your part.
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