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Tips

How to Photograph Puppies

How to Photograph Puppies

Okay, so it’s true that I’ve already written a tutorial or two about photographing dogs. So you maybe asking yourself, “how is photographing puppies any different than photographing dogs?” Well, if you’re asking that question, you’ve obviously never had a puppy. Puppies and dogs sometimes almost seem to be different species. There’s the older dog who would really rather warm himself by the fire than go chasing after a stick, and then there is the puppy, who’d rather chase that stick than do just about anything. One animal is quiet, well-trained, and easier to capture with your camera, the other one is always on the move, doesn’t know the meaning of the word “sit,” and thinks the lens of your expensive DSLR might actually be an extension of the stick he was just chasing a few minutes ago.
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How to Photograph your Flower or Vegetable Garden

How to Photograph your Flower or Vegetable Garden

Not everyone has a brown thumb like mine. We’re talking terrifyingly brown, like toxic rays of plant-killing energy emanating from my thumbs at all times brown. If you’re one of those fortunate people who is not like me and has a way with flowers and vegetables as well as a way with a camera, you have a constant source of photographic inspiration in your own backyard. Keep reading to find out how to take fabulous photos of your garden.
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Photographing Flocks of Birds

Photographing Flocks of Birds

As photographers, we’re often told to avoid chaos. “Keep it simple” is one of the many rules that we try to follow, which is why you may find it difficult to photograph flocks of birds. What could be more chaotic than a bunch of shrieking geese or a flock of pigeons? But the good news is that it is possible to capture some sense of order in those crazy flocks, you just need to have a plan. Keep reading for some ideas.
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Linear Versus Circular Polarizers

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Linear Versus Circular Polarizers

What’s the difference between a polarizing filter and a neutral density filter? The answer is that they’re both like sunglasses for your lens, but they are just as different from each other as a standard pair of sunglasses is from a pair that is polarized. A neutral density filter simply cuts back on the amount of light that reaches your camera’s sensor, which allows you to shoot at slower shutter speeds in brighter conditions. A polarizing filter, on the other hand, only cuts back on a certain kind of light –
and to further complicate the matter, there are two different kinds of polarizing filters: a linear polarizing filter and a circular polarizing filter. Do you know the difference? Read on to find out the answer.
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The GoPro: it’s not just for extreme sports

The GoPro: it’s not just for extreme sports

If you don’t already own a GoPro, you’ve at least seen them. The most common place to find a GoPro is attached to helmets or bicycle handlebars – they’re extremely popular amongst people who are active or are into extreme sports. But GoPro’s are great for other purposes as well – you don’t need to jump off of a cliff or out of an airplane to get good use out of one. So what else can you do with a GoPro? Keep reading to find out.
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How To Get Your Work Out There

How To Get Your Work Out There

A long time ago, before the Internet… yes, it is true, the pre-Internet days were not just the stuff of myth and legend, they actually existed. Anyway, long ago, before the Internet, a photographer – even a good photographer – had a difficult time getting noticed. Today it’s a lot easier. Keep reading for some tips on how to get your work out there in the public.
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Which File Format File Format Is Best – JPG or RAW?

Which File Format File Format Is Best – JPG or RAW?

Most modern digital cameras give you a choice of file formats when saving your image. It’s very helpful to know the benefits (and disadvantages) of each file format so you can make the best decision on the file format to save your images in.
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Photographing Sight – Five Senses

Photographing Sight – Five Senses

I spend a lot of time on this blog talking about how we can bring a sense of three dimensions to that two-dimensional medium that we work within. A photograph, no matter how good it is, is only a two dimensional piece of art. We view it on a flat piece of paper or on a two dimensional computer monitor, and we only view it with our eyes. That is one of the biggest challenges that photographers have to overcome. If the photos you shoot can only be interpreted two-dimensional pictures on a flat surface, then those photos are not going to do a very good job of inspiring emotion. And inspiring emotion is ultimately what we seek to accomplish as photographers.
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2017 Photographer’s Gift Guide

2017 Photographer’s Gift Guide

Hey, guess what? It’s the holidays again. That’s right, it’s time to gather around the fire, sing songs, drink hot cocoa and stress about what you’re going to buy for everyone. Wait, who am I kidding, no one gathers around the fire and sings songs anymore, because we’re all too busy stressing out about what we’re going to buy for everyone.

It doesn’t have to be that way! At least not if your friends and family are all photographers like you. And if they’re not, well, I’m sorry. You can still use this list as your own personal wish list, which will at least stop your mom from texting you every five minutes wanting to know what she should buy you for Christmas. Anyway, here’s my annual gift list, from the inexpensive to the sort-of expensive. Happy holidays!
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Ideas For Great Family Christmas Portraits

Ideas For Great Family Christmas Portraits

If you’re like many family photographers, shooting Christmas portraits is the bane of your existence. It’s the post-Halloween horror that haunts your nightmares. Nothing is quite so impossible as rounding all the kids up, expecting them to put on their Christmas finery, stand within a few inches of each other, and, (god forbid) smile. Not just a “say cheese!” smile, but the sort of genuine smile that will actually charm the friends and family who see the picture on the front of your Christmas card.

If that sounds like an exaggeration, it’s because you’ve never tried to shoot a family Christmas photo and you’ve never had this experience for yourself. Shooting a family Christmas portrait is probably one of the most challenging things that you’ll do all year, unless for some reason you are lucky enough to have the sort of family that only exists in a 1950s television sitcom.
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Getting The Most out of Macro Mode

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Getting The Most out of Macro Mode

There was once a time when you needed a DSLR and a pretty expensive macro lens in order to capture excellent macro photos. Sure, you could add screw-on close-up filters and extension tubes to a regular lens and use that to get pretty close to your subject, but that still required that you own a DSLR. If all you had was a point-and-shoot or other camera without interchangeable lenses, you were pretty much out of luck.

The digital age has brought lots of innovations in camera technology, and one of those innovations is that you are no longer required to own an expensive SLR camera in order to take amazing close-up photos of small objects. Today, most point-and-shoot cameras have a macro mode, which allows you to get anywhere from 10 cm to up to 2 cm away from your subject. That means you can focus in on incredibly small objects and get richly detailed photographs of those objects without having to spend a fortune on equipment.
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How to photograph bats

How to photograph bats

If you have ever tried to photograph birds, you probably thought to yourself, “These have got to be the most difficult animals to take pictures of.” And you’re not completely wrong. Birds are challenging subjects – they are flighty (literally), they are small, and they are fast. You need a lot of patience and a pretty long lens to get a good picture of them. But they are not, in fact, the most difficult animals to take pictures of. That honor belongs to another flying creature – the bat.
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How to Photograph Life

How to Photograph Life

A wise man once said, “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.” OK it wasn’t exactly a wise man, it was Matthew Broderick in the 1986 film Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. But you can’t deny the truth in those words. I bet there are times when you stop and think to yourself, “The year is over and I totally missed it.” That’s a small tragedy, and it happens to all of us.
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How to photograph local environmental stories

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How to photograph local environmental stories

There’s really no way to sugarcoat it: human activities have an impact on the environment, sometimes a negative impact. Whether it’s just a new housing development, the deforestation of a wooded area, or of closing of a local park, there’s almost certainly something happening in your city or town that’s going to have a negative impact on the environment.

Now, different people see these issues differently, and we’re not here to discuss the merits of being pro-environment or pro-business. There are multiple sides to every environmental issue, and regardless of which side you happen to be on, you can still document these environmental issues with your camera.
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How to photograph reptiles

How to photograph reptiles

Animal photography always presents challenges, depending on the animal and the situation. Wild animals, of course, are elusive, which means you often need a telephoto lens and a certain amount of patience to photograph them. Pets are easier, but making a playful dog sit still long enough for a photo or a curious cat resist the temptation to put her nose in the lens are challenges you might encounter even with the most photogenic of pets. No what about reptiles? They are neither friendly nor playful, and yet they can make for some incredibly interesting and engaging subjects. Read on for some tips on how to photograph them.
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