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Archive for May, 2010

4 Ways To Share Your New Photos With Your Friends

4 Ways To Share Your New Photos With Your Friends

There are more ways to share information today than there has been in the history of mankind. As a photographer, your options are practically limitless. You can hop on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, Myspace, Photobucket, and plenty of others. They all allow you to upload your favorite photos and share them with your friends. So much of this is going on that it seems as though a new way to share pictures gets invented and released to the public every week. Considering this, I think it’s a much more fruitful endeavor to tell you about some of my favorites instead of going over all of your options.
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The ABC’s of Storing Your Digital Photos

The ABC’s of Storing Your Digital Photos

If you are like me, you love taking as many digital photos as you can. You go out to shoot, fill up your SD card, and then pull a few more cards out of your pouch before continuing on. By now, you probably have at least a few gigabytes of digital photos on your hard drive. That is a lot to keep track of, and if you don’t manage them somehow, you’ll end up losing all of your favorites. So, in an effort to make your photo viewing and sharing more enjoyable and less frustrating, I am presenting my tried and true digital photo storage methods. They have served me for years, and I am certain they will serve you.
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How To Get The Perfect Golden Sun

How To Get The Perfect Golden Sun

I only have one word for this shot. WOW! Of course, I am a sucker for a great sunset photo. The way the bright orange just bursts forth and diffuses itself through the clouds will always take my breath away. We discussed how you can take pictures like this in a previous tutorial, but I would like to use this critique to discuss it in more detail. It takes a lot of playing around with camera settings to get something like this. The more patient you are, and the more you enjoy trying out different settings, the more likely you are to stumble upon a shot like this one.
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Do more Megapixels mean better photo quality?

Do more Megapixels mean better photo quality?

They’re getting better every year. Camera makers and your local Best Buy salesman are always talking about the next model with more megapixels than the one that came before it. The new numbers make your current model seem obsolete. If you bought a camera with six megapixels a few years ago, you wish you could get a new one that gets twelve. But does it really mean anything? Does having more megapixels amount to better photo quality, or is it all just marketing hype?
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Photo Critique: Macro on a Point-And-Shoot

Photo Critique: Macro on a Point-And-Shoot

With as much discussion as we have been having about the difference between point-and-shoot cameras and DSLRs lately, it is only appropriate to continue our theme and explore some more pictures you can easily take with a point-and-shoot camera. A lot of people think that because they do not have a macro lens mounted on a DSLR, they can’t take good macro photos. This simply isn’t true. If you have a miniature tripod and an eye for framing your shot, you can create some amazing macro photos without owning a macro-specific lens.
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How to Crop Your Digital Photo for Printing

How to Crop Your Digital Photo for Printing

If this isn’t a huge disappointment, please tell me what isn’t. You get a bunch of your point and shoot pictures printed, only to find out that the top and bottom of every photo has been completely cut off. As you stare at the faces and scenes chopped in half, you’re wondering what could have caused this and whether it is your fault as a photographer. Well worry no more. There is a perfectly reasonable explanation, and it has nothing to do with an error on your part.
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Photo Critique: A Point-And-Shoot Sunset

Photo Critique: A Point-And-Shoot Sunset

This week, I challenged you to deliver some of the best point-and-shoot photos you could muster with your setup. The entire purpose of doing this is to convince you all that you do not need a high end camera to have an eye for photography and to produce great work. This photo, sent in by Clifford Spangler, is one such example. He told me he used “a 2002 Nikon Coolpix 4300 that is being held together with tape” to take it. It’s no less than impressive and a great reason for you to spend more time taking pictures and less time worrying about your next camera setup.
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What DSLR Camera Accessories Are The Most Important?

What DSLR Camera Accessories Are The Most Important?

Congratulations! You just purchased your first digital SLR camera. Believe me, you’re going to love it. Digital SLRs are ten times easier to use and much faster than their point and shoot counterparts. But before you head out into the wild and start taking more pictures than you know how to handle, you might want to know a little bit about digital SLR accessories. While some of them are just nice to have, others are absolutely essential and should be purchased with every digital SLR. I’ll walk you through them.
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How To Take Photos of Fast Moving Sports Without Blurring The Subject

How To Take Photos of Fast Moving Sports Without Blurring The Subject

You know what it’s like. You’ve lined up the perfect shot and pressed the shutter at the right moment only to find out later on that everything is blurred. This is one of the biggest frustrations for beginner, and even experienced, sports photographers. It is the moment when people begin to question the camera setup they just purchased, often wondering if those hundreds and thousands of dollars could have been better spent elsewhere.

There is no need for frustration. With an understanding of the environmental factors that come into play, you can anticipate the steps you need to take to capture the moment. Be patient, set your camera up for success, and watch as great action shots emerge.
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Which Quality Setting Should I Use?

Which Quality Setting Should I Use?

You may have noticed that your camera offers a few different photo quality settings. These are available on almost any model in the market today, whether it is a point-and-shoot or a digital SLR. Oftentimes, they are labeled as “low,” “normal,” or “fine.” Some camera companies use their own proprietary quality standards such as SQ, HQ, and SHQ (standard, high and super high quality respectively).
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Photo Critique: Flying In Formation

Photo Critique: Flying In Formation

There has been a lot of recent talk about digital SLR cameras, lens modifications, and whether you need to go out and get a digital SLR right away. Sometimes the best arguments for getting the most out of your point-and-shoot system come from seeing what can be done with them. Usually, this is enough to convince people that the art of photography is not in the camera but the person behind it. This week’s photo critique is centered around that idea. What can and cannot be captured with a point-and-shoot camera? The answer: Almost everything can. It just takes a little more time and a quicker eye.
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How Do I Know When To Switch To A DSLR Camera?

So you’ve had a cheap Point-and-Shoot camera for ages and are looking to upgrade. But should you go with another Point and Shoot (because, they are easy to use and don’t have any complicated features), or should you get a more expensive, but also more capable, DSLR camera?
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What is a Conversion Lens?

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What is a Conversion Lens?

A Conversion Lens extends the functionality of existing cameras by adding to the focal length range of your lens. A Digital conversion lens is a great way to expand your camera’s capabilities without breaking the bank. If you only have a few new shots in mind, and you don’t want to upgrade your whole camera, get a converter.
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