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Archive for September, 2012

Eliminate Closed Eyes and Squinting in Portrait Photos

Eliminate Closed Eyes and Squinting in Portrait Photos

As if red eye isn’t problem enough, how many times have you taken a picture of someone who’s squinting or blinked? Sometimes it just takes a little more thought and consideration before clicking the shutter to avoid these problems. And, as you’ll read, there are times when you don’t necessarily want to avoid closed eyes.
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Photography Inspirations

Photography Inspirations

As photographers, we’re inspired by other photographers and even artists. We can’t help but look at, and even analyze, other photographer’s works. One popular place that’s like window shopping for photographs is Flickr. It’s a great place to share your own work and to comment on other photographer’s images. But, most importantly to be inspired.
I’ve selected 10 great photographers from Flickr who are worth following. By listing these 10 photographers, I hope they motivate and challenge you to keep shooting your best.
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Aerial Photography

Aerial Photography

If you’ve been reading my tips for a while, you already know that good photos are often taken from unusual perspectives. An eye-level shot of a sailboat on the water may be boring, but the same shot taken from water level or from the top of a lighthouse will give the viewer an unusual perspective that will greatly enhance the visual appeal of the image.
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7 Ideas for Overcoming Photographer’s Block and Staying Inspired

7 Ideas for Overcoming Photographer’s Block and Staying Inspired

If writers have writer’s block, artists can have artist’s block and photographers can have photographer’s block. The bigger question is how do we overcome these frustrating blocks? Worst case scenario, they can make us feel like we’ve lost our edge. Like we’ll never find anything interesting to photograph again. There’s no magic purple, green or yellow pill to clear the fuzziness and allow for a breakthrough of ideas to emerge. Staring at your camera for answers probably won’t help either. When you’re experiencing photographer’s block, it seems you need to either dig deeper or take a complete break in order to recharge. Below are seven ideas for overcoming photographer’s block.
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Mountain Landscape Photography Tips

Mountain Landscape Photography Tips

No matter what the season mountains are, by virtue of their beauty, incredibly photogenic. Throw in a myriad of trees and a lake, and you’ve got picture perfect landscapes! However, photographing mountains can be tricky depending on the season and the effect you’re going for. The polarizer filter is the one filter in particular that will be a common theme in each scenario below. It’s a must have filter for landscape photography, and as you’ll see, for a different reason in almost every season!
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Up, Up and Away with Hot Air Balloon Photography

Up, Up and Away with Hot Air Balloon Photography

They’re bright and colorful; they usually come with beautiful landscape and skies surround them; and you almost can’t go wrong photographing them. What are they? Hot air balloons! But, the truth is, you can go a bit wrong photographing them. So, I’m dedicating this post to tips for giving you a boost of confidence when you head out to capture these magnificent balloons.
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Front Light vs Side Light vs Back Light

Filed in Light, Tips by 7 Comments
Front Light vs Side Light vs Back Light

Without light of some sort, you’d be hard pressed to capture a picture. Understanding how to use, manipulate, and incorporate light is the most critical aspect of photography that you’ll learn. Once you understand light and how it impacts your pictures, you’ll be eons ahead of most beginning photographers.

Part of learning about lighting is getting the hang of the three main different angles: front light, side light, and back light. Like most photo scenarios, your subject matter matters! Front, side and back lighting a person for a portrait takes a different thought process than it does for landscapes, fine art or commercial photography. No matter what your subject is though, master lighting and you’ll be on your way to pro.
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How to use a zoom lens: When, what, and what not to do

Filed in Lens, Tips by 5 Comments
How to use a zoom lens: When, what, and what not to do

Zoom lenses are wonderful things! Learning how to use a zoom lens can be one of the most productive, and pleasurable, things you’ll do in a while! Whether you’ve got a compact camera or a DSLR, these tips will apply to you.
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Choosing A Digital Camera For Your Child

Filed in Camera, Tips by 1 Comment
Choosing A Digital Camera For Your Child

What could be scarier than trying to get a great picture of an uncooperative child? Here’s your answer: the uncooperative child grabs your expensive digital camera and tries to take YOUR picture. Yes, every parent’s nightmare. Time to get that kid her own camera. And you thought picking out a camera for yourself was challenging! How do you choose a camera for a 3-year-old? How about an 8-year-old or a 12-year old?
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When Autofocus Fails, And How To Fix It

Filed in Focus, Tips by 4 Comments
When Autofocus Fails, And How To Fix It

You might be interested to know that the first commercially available autofocus camera was actually a point and shoot model! Autofocus was developed in the 70s and 80s and revolutionized the way people used their cameras. Photographers today just take autofocus for granted. That is, of course, until it doesn’t work!

It’s probably happened to all of us – you compose your picture, half depress the shutter button to focus… and the lens whirs backwards and forwards (this is called ‘hunting’) without focusing as we expect it to. For some reason the lens ‘hunts’ for a focus point but can’t find it. Or you take a photograph and find that the background, or foreground, is in focus but the subject isn’t. Very irritating! Here’s how to avoid the problem.
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How DSLRs Have Improved Over The Years

How DSLRs Have Improved Over The Years

Cars and cameras have changed so much over the past decade that I’m starting to think a lease option might be a good idea. Whether you’re on the Nikon or Canon side of the fence, or another fence altogether, the new generation of cameras are incredible compared to their predecessors. The biggest boost is that they accommodate more light scenarios than ever before, which is just what we want to hear. Plus, from megapixels to sensors to ISO settings to frames per seconds (fps) rates, and I must add improved flash/memory cards, the latest DSLRs are making photographers more pixel-happy than ever before.
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Food that Looks Good Enough to Eat

Filed in Food, Tips by 1 Comment
Food that Looks Good Enough to Eat

You’ve probably heard the phrase “we eat with our eyes first.” That’s particularly true with food photography, when the goal is to take photographs that sell–literally or figuratively–a food or recipe to a hungry viewer.

Taking good food photos can be especially tricky because perhaps more than any other subject, food images suffer when the lighting is poor and the composition is careless. Any other subject might look OK when those elements aren’t quite perfect, but the difference between perfect light and less than perfect light can mean the difference between food that looks delicious and food that looks downright unappetizing. So how can you make sure that your food images will make your viewers hungry rather than encouraging them to stick to their diets? Let’s find out.
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Photographing Double Rainbows

Photographing Double Rainbows

Many if us are surprised that iPhone photography is gaining the ranks of approval among serious photographers. Photographer Heather Hummel read the ebook I reviewed on iPhone Photography and it gave her inspiration to use her iPhone to capture this wonderful image of a double rainbow on a ranch in Colorado (USA) rather than her DSLR camera. Heather’s image utilized many of the apps and steps used in the ebook, so I asked Heather to share with us how this image came to be. As you’ll see, it’s not as simple as what meets the eye, but with the right apps and some willingness to learn, you can create some pretty cool panoramic images with your own iPhone.
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Review: iPhone Photography by Misho Baranovic

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Review: iPhone Photography by Misho Baranovic

Can you believe that the iPhone 4 and 4S are the most used cameras for uploading images to Flickr? Yes, that means they beat out our friends at Nikon and Canon. So, it’s no surprise that books on iPhone photography are popping up, and this one, simply titled iPhone Photography: How to Shoot, Edit and Share Great Photographs, pleasantly surprised me. The author, Misho Baranovic, compiled a pretty comprehensive book that’s well organized and represented by other iPhone photographers.
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