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Archive for April, 2013

David’s Next Project…

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David’s Next Project…

People are always emailing me and asking me what I’m going to do next. They insist there MUST be some master plan unfolding for a digital photography revolution, right??

Well, not exactly.

But I HAVE been working on a super-secret plan for the last few months, and I’m getting very close to rolling it out.

It’s not quite ready, and I definitely don’t have anything for sale… but I’m getting really excited about sharing it with you.
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Infrared Photography

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Infrared Photography

If you’ve studied and practised photography for long enough, you know that a great photo is one that gives the viewer a unique perspective on the world. That can be done in many different ways–by choosing a unique subject, by taking the photo from an unusual vantage point, by carefully selecting depth of field or shutter speed, or by experimenting with camera equipment such as filters and special lenses.

One way to almost guarantee a photo will make people stop and take notice is to try your hand at infrared photography. Now, if you’ve ever spent time watching scary movies you’ve probably already seen infrared in action – apparently that’s one way to spot a ghost – but you may not be familiar with using infrared (IR) to capture less frightening scenes, such as landscapes. And you don’t have to go shopping at the Catch-A-Ghost Emporium either, nor do you have to spend a truckload of money on high tech equipment. You can start capturing great IR photos, in fact, for around 100 bucks – with the understanding of course that if you get hooked on it you might want to make further investments.
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Twenty Outstanding Infrared Photographs

Twenty Outstanding Infrared Photographs

Infrared photography is one of those art forms that looks more difficult than it actually is. Infrared photos can be captured with the assistance of a lens filter such as the Hoya RM72 (plus a tripod) or with a DSLR that has been modified to capture infrared light. Most of the images you see here have had some sort of post-processing done to achieve the interesting and unusual tones that are the hallmark of infrared photography.
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Will Android cameras replace the point-and-shoot?

Will Android cameras replace the point-and-shoot?

A little while ago I wrote about the Nikon Coolpix S800c, the Android-powered camera that is essentially a smart phone/point and shoot hybrid. The S800c is now part of a revolution – sort of. It might be more accurate to just call it a pioneer, like those first airplanes that weren’t particularly safe and really couldn’t cover much distance, but showed great potential for the future – if only designers could get past all those bumps in the road… err, sky.

The S800c isn’t the only bird in the sky: Samsung released its Galaxy Camera late last year, and Polaroid has just announced the iM1836, which has the distinction of being the world’s first Android-based camera with interchangeable lenses. So now that there is actually a smattering of choice in this marketplace, is it a good time to jump on the “smart camera” bandwagon?
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How Can I Safely Travel with My DSLR Gear?

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How Can I Safely Travel with My DSLR Gear?

There are lots of photo opportunities at home and in your neighborhood. But let’s face it, traveling really gives your inner photographer a chance to soar. Photo opportunities in travel-worthy destinations are easy to find and just begging to be taken advantage of, so why leave your DSLR behind?
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Photographing Seascapes

Photographing Seascapes

Nothing inspires that inner photographer quite like the ocean. The crashing surf, those sailboats on the horizon, seabirds cruising just above the water – it would be a crime not to overshoot such a scene. So how come the photos you take home from the beach sometimes just don’t manage to capture the drama and beauty of the ocean?

The answer of course is dimension, just like it is in so many other landscapes. The ocean is three dimensional and a photograph is not. To capture the full beauty of the ocean you must somehow also capture that sense of depth. But that’s not all – ocean photography is all about timing, too, and finding just the right time and just the right beach is the key to a great seascape.
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What You Need to Know about UV Filters

What You Need to Know about UV Filters

When we think of UV, we think of sunscreen and ultraviolet rays. When it comes to photography, the thought of a UV filter is to protect the lens. But, what else does it do? To better answer this, it’s important to understand more clearly what UV light is. The visible light spectrum runs from red to violet. Red light has the longest wavelength and violet light has the shortest. Light with a longer wavelength than red is called infrared, and light with a shorter wavelength than violet is called ultra violet or UV.
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7 Tips for Photographing Senior Citizens

7 Tips for Photographing Senior Citizens

You’ve probably seen all the articles on tips for photographing kids and teens. They’re popular lens candy due to their smooth skin and expressive faces. But, senior citizens bring a totally different character to the lens that shouldn’t be dismissed.

Kids tend to live in a state of wonder where seniors live in a state of wisdom. Life experience has given them that right. As a photographer, it’s an ideal opportunity to capture that wisdom in their expressions, their wrinkles, and in their energy. Whether posed or candid, pulling those decades of experiences to the surface and through the lens is an art in and of itself.

In honor of the elderly generation, I’m providing 7 tips for photographing them.
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Photographing Birds In Flight

Photographing Birds In Flight

You remember those holidays with Mom and Dad, right? When they brought their little point and shoot along to the beach and took some snaps of the seagulls flying by (just before they got sand in the camera)? Like many tourists, they were probably excited to see those shots in print – and then disappointed to discover that the birds that seemed so close and photographic at the moment the shutter was released are nothing more than blurry specs on an overexposed sky. Sigh.

Despite the rapid advance of camera technology, the same problem might plague you even today. But don’t sweat it – owning a camera doesn’t automatically make you a National Geographic photographer. Those stunning shots of bald eagles catching an updraft and pelicans cruising above a sandy shore are hard to master, and are often accomplished with expensive equipment and a whole lot of wasted frames. So does that mean it’s impossible for a hobbyist to capture a beautiful shot of a bird in flight? Not if you keep these tips in mind.
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How Digital Camera CCDs and CMOSs Work

How Digital Camera CCDs and CMOSs Work

Today I’m going to go a bit geeky on you. I think it’s important to not only understand how photography works in terms of apertures, shutter speeds, and ISOs, but to also understand how the innards of your camera work. Image sensors are a good place to start, since most people know they exist, but don’t know why!
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Great Photos To Sell Your Car

Great Photos To Sell Your Car

We baby them. We wash them. We buy them accessories. No doubt about it, we humans love our cars. We love them so much that we include them, to a certain degree, in our family records. Who doesn’t have a photo of himself holding the keys to his brand new car? Or one of the kids sitting in the back seat on a road trip? Our cars are a big part of our lives, so it’s almost a given that they deserve some space in the family album.

But here’s the funny thing about cars—they’re ubiquitous. Every city street has got parked cars, moving cars, sitting-in-traffic cars and everything in between. If you’re going to photograph your car—or any other car—you have to do something to make it look different from all those other, run-of-the-mill cars. You have to make it seem special, unique and worth looking at. So for this lesson, let’s focus on capturing some really stand-out photos of cars.
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Taking Zoo Photographs That Don’t Look Like They Were Taken at the Zoo

Taking Zoo Photographs That Don’t Look Like They Were Taken at the Zoo

Every photographer is planning to go on an African safari some day, even those of us who know we’re probably never going to go on an African safari. But dreaming is fun, and if you don’t really think you’re going to ever get out there in that zebra striped jeep chasing elephants and watching lions take down wildebeests, there’s a next-best thing. That’s right! It’s your local zoo. And if you play it right, your photos might look as if you actually went out on safari.
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Electrifying Lightning Photography

Electrifying Lightning Photography

There are very few photographic subjects like lightning. Lightning is unpredictable, appears only for a split second and is best captured by pointing your camera at an empty piece of sky and hoping something happens. A good lightning image cannot fail to impress a viewer, though, who will probably think you got that image by engaging in some thrilling, dangerous storm chasing, maybe even in a torrential downpour while riding in an open-topped jeep across a rocky field. Yes, on the coolness scale there isn’t much that rivals a good lightning photo, except maybe a tornado.
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7 Tips for How to Take Close Up Photos of Nature

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7 Tips for How to Take Close Up Photos of Nature

Considering the billions of photographs out there, few of them have the tendency to stop us in our tracks and to really observe them the way close up nature photos do. There’s something compelling about the details in a micro world that isn’t always visible to the eye. There’s something awe inspiring about seeing a landscape image… the big view. But with macro photography, it’s as though we have zoomed in with a microscope or magnifying glass on a landscape photo to view the finite details.

Nature calendars are top sellers each year because of their inherent beauty that draws us in to a world that allows us to escape our own. From roaring oceans to rambling brooks to flower laden meadows nature inspires us to not only photograph it, but to observe it. As photographers, we’re lucky to find ourselves out there amongst the trees and fields and rivers finding something, almost anything, that captures our eye and lens.

This draw to nature doesn’t mean that it comes easy to photograph. It can be quite simple at times, but there are still tips worth noting, and that’s what I’m about to provide you with.
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Painting with Light

Filed in Light, Tips by 0 Comments
Painting with Light

You’ve heard me talk a lot lately about inspiration, and about how to find great photos in boring places. Let’s say you’ve tried a bunch of those tips but would really like to break out of that whole reality box and try something completely different. Here’s an idea: get yourself a flashlight, a few glow-sticks from the dollar store and a tripod and try painting with light.
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