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Archive for January, 2017

How to learn from your mistakes (or, why no photo is a wasted photo)

How to learn from your mistakes (or, why no photo is a wasted photo)

This might have been a harder sell a few decades ago, when a ruined photograph meant some sort of financial cost. Back in the day, if you ruined a whole roll of 36 exposures, you’d be pretty annoyed it yourself. Not only would you be out the cost of the film, you’d also be out of the cost of the development and the time that it took to take your film into the photo shop or pharmacy and wait around for it to come back. And after all of that, you might not be inclined to look at those exposures and try to figure out what went wrong. In fact, you might be annoyed enough that you just throw the whole lot in a trashcan and try to get on with your life.

Today, things are different. Today, we don’t have to pay for every exposure, so we can shoot 36 of them, or even 100, get them all completely wrong and not have to pay a dime. Of course, you might argue that there is a loss of time to take into consideration, but my counter argument would be that the time hasn’t really been lost. Because whenever you make a mistake of any kind, there is an opportunity to learn from that mistake. And these days we also have a little something called EXIF, which helps make it even easier to look at those failed photographs and judge exactly where they went wrong. Read on for more. Continue Reading »

How to give your photos a sense of place

How to give your photos a sense of place

Travel photography is something pretty much all of us do. If you ever leave your house with your camera, and you travel farther away than your hometown to take photographs, you are a travel photographer.

Whether we’re shooting images of our family and friends out there on the road or just images of the destination itself, very few photographers don’t love to capture visual records of the places we have been. But there’s a difference between just shooting a photograph of a tourist destination and capturing an image that has a real sense of place. How do you know the difference? Read on to find out. Continue Reading »

How to photograph a solar eclipse

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How to photograph a solar eclipse

There was a time when a solar eclipse was considered a bad thing. The ancient Greeks believed that solar eclipses only happened when the gods were angry, and that natural disasters and general destruction were not far behind. The Vikings believed that when an eclipse happened, it was because hungry wolves were eating the sun. And in many cultures, a solar eclipse was said to portend death—King Louis the Pious died shortly after witnessing a solar eclipse, believing that it was a sign of God’s displeasure.

Today, of course, solar eclipses are just cool photography subjects. And they’re easy to photograph, too, provided you have the right equipment and a little bit of know-how. Keep reading to learn more.
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How to Photograph Kids (who don’t want to be photographed)

How to Photograph Kids (who don’t want to be photographed)

We all know about moody teenagers, right? In fact it’s almost a cliché—mom takes camera to event, mom points camera at moody teenager, moody teenager ducks behind another person or object in order to avoid being photographed. It’s maddening. And if you are the parent of that reluctant photographic subject, even more so. Continue Reading »

How to capture personality-filled animal photos

How to capture personality-filled animal photos

There’s no doubt that you love your pet, and if you had to say why, I know you could come up with a myriad of different reasons. And I’d bet money that one of those reasons would be “his personality

We love our pets in part because their fun and funny personalities make us smile, and because in a world of furry faces each animal is his own unique individual. So although you may have hundreds of portrait-style photographs of your pet, how many do you have that actually do a good job of letting your viewer know what his personality is like? If your answer is “not many,” then you need some strategies. Keep reading for my best tips on how to capture personality in your pet photos. Continue Reading »

The secret to perfect exposures

The secret to perfect exposures

If you use auto mode, aperture priority mode or shutter priority mode, you may have noticed something. Most of the time, your camera does a pretty good job figuring out how to expose a shot, but every now and then—maybe even more frequently than you’re comfortable with—you get a photo that’s really overexposed, or really underexposed. How can this happen in auto mode (or priority mode) and is there anything you can do about it? Read on to find the answer. Continue Reading »

How to Photograph a Rodeo

How to Photograph a Rodeo

If you’re already an old hand at shooting sporting events, you may think you have the rodeo thing figured out. How different could it be? In any sporting event, things move fast, so you need to use a fast shutter speed to get clear pictures. Isn’t that all there is to it? Read on to find out. Continue Reading »

Photographing death tastefully

Photographing death tastefully

Death is not a subject that most of us like to talk about. It’s inevitable, but we like to pretend like it isn’t. So it’s not really something that we like to represent with our photography, either. After all, how can photographing death possibly be done tastefully? Read on to find out. Continue Reading »