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Tag: Aperture

Breaking the Rules: Break The Small Aperture Rule

Filed in Tips by on March 20, 2014 0 Comments
Breaking the Rules: Break The Small Aperture Rule

The fundamental rules of photography have great wisdom to offer. Landscapes require great depth of field. Portraits require less depth of field. You should always follow the rule of thirds, except when it’s ok not to. You can’t use fast shutter speeds at night and you can’t use slow shutter speeds during the day.

But you and I both know that just about every one of those fundamental wisdoms can sometimes be ignored. All you really need to know is when and how. That’s why I’m bringing you this series on breaking the rules.
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Taking Your First Night Photos

Filed in Tips by on March 20, 2014 0 Comments
Taking Your First Night Photos

We all lead busy lives. The world is likely dark when you get up and has already settled back into darkness by the time you get home. Not exactly great for getting your camera out and taking some shots. Have you ever considered getting out at night to take photos? Night photography can be intimidating but don’t be afraid of the dark! Read on to learn how to take your first night photographs. Night, night baby!
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9 Tips for Lifestyle Photography

Filed in Tips by on March 15, 2014 0 Comments
9 Tips for Lifestyle Photography

Often times, the photographs we feel the most connected to are simple. They freeze time, a moment as it is, instead of the contrived editorial work of fashion shoots and perfume ads. Babies sitting on a shiny hardwood floor, kids in an intense game of flag football, this season’s first snowfall. These photos are so easy to connect with because they are honest portrayals of life. This is called lifestyle photography. Lifestyle photography is a genre of photography which serves the purpose of documenting life honestly and artistically by capturing authentic, usually candid moments as they happen. What that actually translates to in regards to actual photographs depends on you the photographer and your artistic vision.
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13 Tips for Inspired Concert Photography

Filed in Tips by on March 7, 2014 1 Comment
13 Tips for Inspired Concert Photography

Concerts are a symbiotic experience, each one unique to the music, the musicians, and the audience. The reciprocal nature appeals to us on a visceral level. It’s a way to connect with people over a shared interest and at times, a shared adrenaline rush. Of course, it is then natural, to want to capture the natural high only found when your heart is in sync with the bass drum. As photographers our first instinct is to bring the camera along and take the experience home with us in the form of photographs. Concert photography is a particularly difficult medium because of the varied and rapidly changing lighting situations, masses of people, and quickly moving musicians. Here are the basics for concert photography that will live up to your memories.
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How Changing Aperture Changes Other Settings

Filed in Tips by on February 16, 2014 0 Comments
How Changing Aperture Changes Other Settings

Your camera has three primary settings that are interconnected: aperture, shutter speed and ISO. You can’t adjust one without adjusting the other, because each one is fundamental to the way your camera captures light, which is ultimately what it uses to make an exposure. Smaller apertures mean slower shutter speeds, or higher ISOs. Larger apertures mean faster shutter speeds, or lower ISOs. So how do you work out what settings to use?
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Beautiful Bokeh

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Beautiful Bokeh

Whether you realize it or not, you have seen bokeh plenty of times. It is there in any photograph with a shallow depth of field. In its simplest form, bokeh is just blur. That great portrait shot you take with the blurry background? The background is called bokeh. Whether the bokeh is “good” or “bad”, and if it adds to the artistry of the photo is a matter of opinion. There are several key factors in creating what many consider beautiful bokeh – those areas of pleasant, soft focus. Read on to learn about the “qualities” of bokeh, how to create it, and some creative composition techniques that utilize it.
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How To Choose an Aperture to Control Depth of Field

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How To Choose an Aperture to Control Depth of Field

If you own a camera, you’ve probably at least heard the term “aperture.” But your understanding of what that means may depend a lot on what kind of camera you own, and how you use it. Today, I’ll explain exactly how the aperture setting affects your images, and what aperture settings to use in which situations.
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Why Your Kit Lens Just Doesn’t Cut It

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Why Your Kit Lens Just Doesn’t Cut It

Intermediate The title of this article may fill you with worry or anger or frustration. Did you invest in a nice, digital camera only to find you still have blurry, dull photos? There may be operator problems involved but your lens could also be the culprit. You most likely spent upwards of $500 on a DSLR camera body and now I am telling you the kit lens it came with is not all that hot. Unfortunately that is the truth but don’t throw in the towel yet. You can still use your kit lens while working towards the purchase of a relatively low cost but much higher quality lens. Yes, such a thing does exist! Read on to find out some options that could greatly improve the quality of your photos.
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16 Tips for Better Landscapes

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16 Tips for Better Landscapes

To the snap-shooter, nothing could be simpler than a landscape. Just find some pretty scenery, lift your camera and press the button. Viola! Landscape.

Now if you’re not a mere snap-shooter, you know the absolute folly of what I just said. While it’s true that it’s easy to shoot a landscape, it is also extremely difficult to capture one. What I mean of course is that anyone can lift a camera and press the button, and because landscapes don’t move it seems as if capturing one should be as easy as that. But you and I both know that recreating a beautiful, three-dimensional scene in a two dimensional medium is much more difficult than just hitting that shutter button. Let’s see how to do it…
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Take Photos in Manual Mode for a Month

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Take Photos in Manual Mode for a Month

Remember when you were a kid and your dad ceremoniously took the training wheels off your bike. You started out with him holding the back of your bike seat as he ran alongside of you as you pedaled. The next thing you knew his voice was in the distance yelling, “You did it!” What happened after that moment, whether you fell off the bike and scrapped your knew or kept on pedaling, doesn’t matter. The fact is, you rode without the assistance of training wheels.

Swimming might have been a similar experience. Whether you’re young enough to have had those flotation devices or whether you too swimming lessons with someone holding you as you tried to swim from one side of the pool to the other. Eventually, the swimmies and the hands beneath you went away and you swam on your own.

Are you seeing where I’m going with this? It’s time. Yes, it’s time to drop the “Auto” crutch and switch to “Manual” mode on your camera. In order to graduate from hobbyist or amateur to professional in training, there comes a time where you have to free yourself of the help.

Here’s my challenge for you: for one month only use Manual Mode. Of course I wouldn’t put you on a bike or in a pool without some assistance to get you started. If you’ve been a regular reader of my articles, you hopefully know a good deal of what I’m about to tell you, but perhaps have been resistant to letting go of your good friend, Auto Mode.
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Understanding Camera Lenses

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Understanding Camera Lenses

Intermediate “One of the many revelations that photographers have is discovering the difference between letting your camera decide how to do something, and telling your camera what to do.” – James Brandon

I love that quote by James Brandon because it speaks to all that I do to inform photographers on how to use their camera to its fullest. Naturally, part of your camera is the lens you use with it. This post is dedicated to helping you determine which lenses are best for you so that you can control the outcome of your images.
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Taking Zoo Photographs That Don’t Look Like They Were Taken at the Zoo

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Taking Zoo Photographs That Don’t Look Like They Were Taken at the Zoo

Every photographer is planning to go on an African safari some day, even those of us who know we’re probably never going to go on an African safari. But dreaming is fun, and if you don’t really think you’re going to ever get out there in that zebra striped jeep chasing elephants and watching lions take down wildebeests, there’s a next-best thing. That’s right! It’s your local zoo. And if you play it right, your photos might look as if you actually went out on safari.
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Three Photography Basics

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Three Photography Basics

In the days before point and shoot cameras – back when SLR cameras didn’t have any automatic features at all, everyone who wanted to take photographs had to understand the basic principles of exposure. Film was expensive and you just couldn’t afford to waste a shot on a guess, so you had to really understand how your camera functioned and what settings you needed to use to ensure a correct exposure.

Today we have the great luxury of the “auto” setting, and because of that a lot of us have gotten lazy. So lazy, in fact, that there are some people who love photography, own DSLRs and consider themselves to be photographers on at least some level that still don’t understand those very basic principles of exposure. And for those of us who do have a basic understanding, a quick review is never a bad thing. Ready?
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Taking Great Photos at the County Fair

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Taking Great Photos at the County Fair

Funnel cakes, ferris wheels and fun houses – what could be better than a county fair? With all those sights and lights, carnival photos should almost take themselves. Except that they usually don’t. So why is it so easy to capture blurry, chaotic and generally uninteresting shots at a carnival, and so hard to bring home photos that wow?

Carnival photography is tricky for a couple of reasons, and once you can pinpoint why your photos don’t have that wow-factor, you’ll be able to avoid those ever-present shooting conditions that create uninteresting photos even in that most interesting of settings.
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What Specs Really Matter in a DSLR?

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What Specs Really Matter in a DSLR?

You’ve saved your pennies, make that dollars and a lot of them, and now you’re ready for a new DSLR. Whether it’s your first one or if you’re upgrading, there’s one question that remains the same: What specs matter? From megapixel ratings to ISO to sensor size to full HD video capability, there’s a lot to consider. The good news is that nowadays almost, if not all, of the DSLRs out there have most of the basics, it’s just a matter of to what extent. Sort of like when all phones were available with caller-ID and call-waiting. Those kinds of features that they bragged about even though it was the norm by a certain time period. The same holds true with DSLRs. Megapixels in the double digits are standard. Things like that. So, let’s break the specs down and see what’s important to your photography needs and what’s a given already.
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