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Tag: Exposure

How to Photograph the Moon

Filed in Tips by on March 28, 2014 1 Comment
How to Photograph the Moon

OK, raise your hand if this has happened to you. You’re sitting around on your deck or maybe you’re inside doing something, and suddenly you notice through the trees or through your front window that the moon has just come up, and it’s HUGE. The scenery around the moon is picturesque–maybe it’s beautiful trees still lit by the last light from the sunset. Or maybe it’s the skyline of the city where you live. Wow, you think, that would make an awesome picture. You grab your DSLR and go outside to find the perfect vantage point. You frame your shot, take the picture, and viola! A tiny, featureless, glowing ball of overexposed light. Frustrated, you spot meter the moon and adjust your camera’s settings. Now you have a shot where you can actually see a couple of craters, but everything around the moon is pitch black.
Obviously, there’s a secret or two to getting great shots of the moon. I’m going to tell you what they are.
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Outstanding shots of the moon

Filed in Gallery by on March 28, 2014 2 Comments
Outstanding shots of the moon

Moon photography is one of those things that doesn’t always work out the way you’d hoped it would. In fact, unless you are well versed in the art of moon photography, it probably hardly ever works out the way you’d hoped. But take heart, it is possible to get a great moon shot with just a tripod and a 200mm or longer lens. To include the scenery, however, you may also need to be understand the art of Photoshopping–you’ll need to combine two shots (one of the moon and one of the landscape) to get a final image that is well exposed for both parts of the scene.
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Camera Basics: Exposure Compensation

Filed in Tips by on February 27, 2014 3 Comments
Camera Basics: Exposure Compensation

This topic may sound dry as a bone but exposure compensation is one of those things I wish I had figured out a lot earlier in my photography experience. As a beginner photographer I was just excited to get out and use my camera, so I basically got it out of the box, put it in auto mode, and began taking pictures. That was great for a while but soon I was itching to have more control and use more of its functions. The next step for me was Aperture Priority mode. It allowed me to start taking more control over my camera, without the complexity of Manual Mode.

And that’s where exposure compensation comes in handy. This valuable tool allows us to shoot in aperture priority mode but still fine tune the exposure! Awesome, right? Read on to find out how.
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How Changing Aperture Changes Other Settings

Filed in Tips by on February 16, 2014 0 Comments
How Changing Aperture Changes Other Settings

Your camera has three primary settings that are interconnected: aperture, shutter speed and ISO. You can’t adjust one without adjusting the other, because each one is fundamental to the way your camera captures light, which is ultimately what it uses to make an exposure. Smaller apertures mean slower shutter speeds, or higher ISOs. Larger apertures mean faster shutter speeds, or lower ISOs. So how do you work out what settings to use?
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How To Photograph A Ghost

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How To Photograph A Ghost

Confession: I have never photographed a real ghost. So this tutorial is not going to help you stake out a haunted house or a cemetery, or advise you on which expensive piece of equipment you’ll need to buy in order to detect subtle changes in the inter-dimensional paranormal space-time continuum other-side.

The good news is, fake ghosts are a lot more agreeable than real ones. You don’t have to worry that your fake ghost is going to go floating off through a wall, leaving nothing but a puddle of ecto-plasmic goo behind for you to slip in. Fake ghosts do what you tell them to do, because they’re fake. That makes photographing them infinitely more enjoyable, and a lot less scary.
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Tips for Great Candlelight Photography

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Tips for Great Candlelight Photography

Want to create a romantic or dramatic mood in your next photo? Try candlelight as a lighting choice. Candle lit photos are absolutely beautiful when taken correctly. As this is a low light situation, there are some tricks to make sure your photos are correctly exposed. Read on for some tricks for taking great photos by candlelight.
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Motion Blur Photography

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Motion Blur Photography

Every photographer knows the anguish of a photo that’s been messed up by motion blur. It happens to all of us – you’re trying to shoot a soccer game at dusk, and as it gets darker your aperture gets wider and your shutter speed gets slower. Finally, you capture that trick shot your son has been practicing all season and, dang. Motion blur. Your soccer star’s feet don’t show clearly, and the background is a mess. The ball looks kind of cool, though.

Ah ha! That’s the part you have to hang on to. The ball looks kind of cool. And motion blur photographs can be really cool, if you shoot them correctly, with purpose, and if you shoot a lot of them.
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Photographic Exposure Explained

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Photographic Exposure Explained

Exposure can be defined as the process of capturing light with your camera to produce an image on the digital sensor. Basically, this is how much light gets into your camera. Each of us has had the experience of taking pictures only to find that they are very dark or way too light. This is caused by incorrect exposure. Today, let’s talk about exposure, what it means to be overexposed and underexposed, and how to achieve proper exposure.
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Dealing with Difficult Lighting Situations

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Dealing with Difficult Lighting Situations

In the Photographer’s Perfect Paradise, the golden hour would last all day long. The light would forever be soft, your subjects would never squint and raccoon eyes would simply be markings on the face of a common North American procyonid.

But alas, we do not live in a Perfect Paradise. After all, we have to get up at dark-o-clock to take advantage of that elusive morning golden hour, and neither it nor the one in the afternoon lasts as long as we need them to. And the rest of the time, the light varies from occasionally splendid to just OK, to absolutely terrible. Can you hear those tiny violins? We photographers have it tough. Painters, they have it made. They can just paint the right light. We have to wait for it to come along. Or do we?
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The Magic Cloth Technique

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The Magic Cloth Technique

Advanced If you shoot landscapes – especially scenes containing water, such as waterfalls, oceans and lakes, you probably already know something about using a neutral density (ND) filter. The neutral density filter is the go-to tool for any photographer who wants to take a long exposure during daylight hours. All those stunning images of misty oceans and rivers that you’ve admired were probably taken with ND filters. But if you don’t have a set of ND filters there is another trick you can employ to capture similar images – and it’s less expensive and more flexible than a set of ND filters, too.
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Shooting in the Snow

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Shooting in the Snow

There’s nothing like a snowy day to inspire your inner photographer. Snow-capped peaks, the sunlight reflecting off ice crystals, kids throwing snowballs at each other – almost everything about the snow begs for photographs. But wait! You can’t just grab your camera and start shooting. Snow creates tricky conditions for photography, and if your photos are going to adequately capture the natural beauty and winter fun of the day, you need to be armed with more than just your camera and a pair of fingerless gloves.
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5 Tips for Photographing Extreme Sports

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5 Tips for Photographing Extreme Sports

Whether they’re coming off a ramp made of snow or concrete or hanging at hundreds of feet in the air, extreme sport athletes are fun to watch. Flying through the air, twirling, or landing the stunt, the crowds are engaged and photographers are clicking away hoping to catch that great shot for their portfolio. Whether you’ve tried to capture these action seeking subjects before or not, these tips on how to do it are sure to inform you; but at the very least I hope to inspire you to get out there and try it.
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Taking Landscape Photos at Night

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Taking Landscape Photos at Night

When you think about your favorite landscape photos, the images that come to mind are probably classic shots of forests, mountains and natural rock formations. And they are probably daytime images, too, with an occasional sunset and sunrise thrown in for good measure.

We don’t really see a lot of landscape images shot at night, which is actually a bit surprising when you think about it. Because nighttime landscapes can be quite stunning, if you know the right tricks.
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Which is best? Spot, Center Weight, or Matrix metering?

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Which is best? Spot, Center Weight, or Matrix metering?

Metering is one of those subjects that makes hobby photographers put their hands over their ears and sing “la la la, I can’t hear you.” That’s because metering is a bit of a complicated subject. After all, who wants to talk about the way your camera estimates exposure? Shouldn’t that stuff happen behind the scenes, so the photographer can focus on important stuff, like composition?

It’s true that many point and shoot cameras – especially the inexpensive ones – have a fixed metering system that doesn’t give you any control over how the meter analyzes light and chooses an exposure. But that doesn’t mean that it’s not important to understand how to use the different metering modes, if your camera offers them. With just a little bit of effort you’ll discover just how useful switching between metering modes can actually be.
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Daytime Long Exposure Photography

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Daytime Long Exposure Photography

As a general rule, most of the pictures you take during the day are shot with a short exposure. And why not? There’s plenty of light during the day, and a long exposure might create unwanted motion blur and maybe even put you at risk for that dreaded camera shake. With the right equipment, though, daytime long exposure photography can be a fun and interesting way to get some really unique and surreal-looking shots of otherwise ordinary scenes. But capturing a good photo with a long exposure can be tricky even at night time, so it’s worth understanding some of the secrets behind this very versatile technique.
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