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Tag: landscape photography

How to Give Your Subject a Sense of Scale

Filed in Tips by on December 18, 2015 0 Comments
How to Give Your Subject a Sense of Scale

The trouble with photographs is the size we print them at. If you get your prints done at the local pharmacy or from online services like Shutterfly or Snapfish, the chances are pretty good that you order most of them at that old standard size of 4×6. And when you think about it, most of the things that you take photographs of are actually a whole lot bigger than that, with the exception of macro subjects. Even when your subject is an average-sized person, he or she dwarfs that 4×6 image stamped on a two dimensional surface. So what’s a photographer to do to give that tiny little image a real sense of scale?
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How to Photograph Bridges

Filed in Tips by on December 3, 2015 1 Comment
How to Photograph Bridges

From cat walks to the Golden Gate, bridges make great photographic subjects. So great, in fact, that many beginners make the mistake of believing that those bridges are just going to photograph themselves. And while it is true that bridges are often spectacular and beautiful, taking great pictures of them is not actually a simple matter. Read on to see my tips and tricks for great bridge photography.
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An Unnatural Element

Filed in Tips by on November 12, 2015 0 Comments
An Unnatural Element

Have you ever sort of felt like you’re done with landscape photography? Even the most die-hard enthusiasts can start to feel a little uninspired after photographing their millionth snowcapped mountain, their million and first waterfall or their million and twentieth scenic overlook. Now I’m not saying that landscape photographs aren’t worth taking, because that would be a statement of great stupidity. But I’ll bet if you could ask him, even Ansel Adams would tell you that he occasionally got a little bored. Don’t worry, though, boredom is easily conquered. Read on to find out how.
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How to Shoot Landscapes at Night

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How to Shoot Landscapes at Night

Landscape photography has a few basic rules that most people learn pretty early on. First, when you shoot a landscape, you need to use a small aperture. That small aperture makes it possible for you to keep the entire scene in focus, from foreground to background.

Another landscape photography rule you probably learned early on has to do with your ISO. Low ISOs, you’ve been told, are critical for landscape photography because your ultimate goal is to capture as much detail as possible. When you use higher ISOs, you can get problems like excess noise, limited total range, and muddy colors. So landscapes need to be shot at ISO 100 or, if your camera gives you the option, at ISOs even lower than that.

So what is a conscientious landscape photographer to do after the sun goes down?
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How to Photograph Fabulous Skies

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How to Photograph Fabulous Skies

There are very few ultimate truths in photography, but here is one of them: when you include the sky in a photograph, it has to be good.

Now, that does not mean that every outdoor photograph needs a sky. It does mean that when you shoot a photo that includes the sky, you can’t let it be boring. But if you’ve been taking outdoor photos for long enough, you’ve probably noticed that there are certain times of day when you just can’t seem to help but capture boring skies. So what can you do to fix this?
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How to Photograph Seascapes

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How to Photograph Seascapes

The ocean is a wonderful place. If you’re like most humans, you are attracted to the crashing waves, the wet sand and the calling birds. People find peace at the ocean, so it naturally follows that people also like to take photos of those crashing waves, wet sand and calling birds. And you can get some particularly marvelous photos by the sea—but there’s definitely an art to doing it well. Keep reading to find out how. Continue Reading »

How to Photograph Fall Colors

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How to Photograph Fall Colors

Ask just about anyone what the best part of autumn is, and I’ll bet you’ll get this reply: it’s the color.

Autumn rivals spring as the most brilliant time of the year, when color is everywhere and inspiration can be found in something as simple as a fallen leaf. With so much beautiful fall foliage all around you, it’s easy to get lulled into a false sense of “these photos will just take themselves,” but don’t. There are some great ways to bring out the best in those beautiful fall colors, and here are a few tips on how to do that.
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How To Photograph Clouds

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How To Photograph Clouds

Here’s a quick and simple experiment for you. Go to Flickr and open up a couple of landscape images. Flip through them, and rank them in order from your favorite to your least favorite. Now compare the sky in each shot. I’d be willing to bet that your favorite landscape images have something in common. More than likely, they have a dramatic sky full of beautiful, textured, clouds. Do you know why?
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Choosing a Tripod

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Choosing a Tripod

A lot of photographers just don’t like tripods. If that’s you, I can certainly sympathize. Tripods are a pain. And once you’ve got your camera and tripod firmly planted in one spot, you don’t have a lot of incentive to undo everything and then move to another spot. But despite all their drawbacks, you really do need a tripod.

Without a tripod, you’ll miss out on creative motion blur images. You’ll also have no wonderful, unique low-light photographs, no landscapes with killer clarity and depth of field, no light painting. Without a tripod, you’re limiting yourself far, far more than you are when you use it in any one location.

But not all tripods are the same. So let’s find out what features are available that might actually be of use (or not) to you, personally.
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Your Next Tripod: The 8 Most Important Features

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Your Next Tripod: The 8 Most Important Features

Tripods are used for a menagerie of photographic purposes. Projects like self-portraits, extended exposure work, and low-light situations are just a few genres that require a tripod because it adds the necessary stability that just can’t be matched by hand holding your camera. Because of their importance, it’s vital to know what to look for before making an investment in a tripod that can’t meet your needs. Here are some things to think about before you take the plunge.
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Why Use A Polarizing Filter?

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Why Use A Polarizing Filter?

Do your landscape shots lack the wow factor? If so, you may want to consider the addition of a polarizing filter to your gear collection. Many photographers, particularly those of the landscape or nature genres, consider this an essential piece of equipment. Polarizing filters can enhance color, and can take an otherwise average scene and transform it to extraordinary.
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How to Photograph the Moon

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How to Photograph the Moon

OK, raise your hand if this has happened to you. You’re sitting around on your deck or maybe you’re inside doing something, and suddenly you notice through the trees or through your front window that the moon has just come up, and it’s HUGE. The scenery around the moon is picturesque–maybe it’s beautiful trees still lit by the last light from the sunset. Or maybe it’s the skyline of the city where you live. Wow, you think, that would make an awesome picture. You grab your DSLR and go outside to find the perfect vantage point. You frame your shot, take the picture, and viola! A tiny, featureless, glowing ball of overexposed light. Frustrated, you spot meter the moon and adjust your camera’s settings. Now you have a shot where you can actually see a couple of craters, but everything around the moon is pitch black.
Obviously, there’s a secret or two to getting great shots of the moon. I’m going to tell you what they are.
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Outstanding shots of the moon

Outstanding shots of the moon

Moon photography is one of those things that doesn’t always work out the way you’d hoped it would. In fact, unless you are well versed in the art of moon photography, it probably hardly ever works out the way you’d hoped. But take heart, it is possible to get a great moon shot with just a tripod and a 200mm or longer lens. To include the scenery, however, you may also need to be understand the art of Photoshopping–you’ll need to combine two shots (one of the moon and one of the landscape) to get a final image that is well exposed for both parts of the scene.
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Cloudy Day? Perfect for photography!

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Cloudy Day? Perfect for photography!

Don’t let anyone tell you that you shouldn’t take photos on overcast days. Sure, cloudy days have their challenges, but they don’t call them “nature’s softbox” for nothing. Just follow a few simple tips and your cloudy day photographs will prove to those naysayers that overcast conditions really are perfect for photography.
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Outstanding Shots of Overcast Skies

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Outstanding Shots of Overcast Skies

Clouds not only create a beautiful, soft, even light, they also add drama to the sky. Shooting a cloudy sky at sunrise or sunset can almost not fail to create a compelling image. If you find yourself in a beautiful setting on a cloudy day, stick around until sunset and grab a few magic hour shots of the skies as the sun goes down. That’s what these photographers did, and look at how amazing their results were.
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