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Tag: landscape photography

Your Next Tripod: The 8 Most Important Features

Filed in Tips by on June 27, 2014 4 Comments
Your Next Tripod: The 8 Most Important Features

Tripods are used for a menagerie of photographic purposes. Projects like self-portraits, extended exposure work, and low-light situations are just a few genres that require a tripod because it adds the necessary stability that just can’t be matched by hand holding your camera. Because of their importance, it’s vital to know what to look for before making an investment in a tripod that can’t meet your needs. Here are some things to think about before you take the plunge.
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Why Use A Polarizing Filter?

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Why Use A Polarizing Filter?

Do your landscape shots lack the wow factor? If so, you may want to consider the addition of a polarizing filter to your gear collection. Many photographers, particularly those of the landscape or nature genres, consider this an essential piece of equipment. Polarizing filters can enhance color, and can take an otherwise average scene and transform it to extraordinary.
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How to Photograph the Moon

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How to Photograph the Moon

OK, raise your hand if this has happened to you. You’re sitting around on your deck or maybe you’re inside doing something, and suddenly you notice through the trees or through your front window that the moon has just come up, and it’s HUGE. The scenery around the moon is picturesque–maybe it’s beautiful trees still lit by the last light from the sunset. Or maybe it’s the skyline of the city where you live. Wow, you think, that would make an awesome picture. You grab your DSLR and go outside to find the perfect vantage point. You frame your shot, take the picture, and viola! A tiny, featureless, glowing ball of overexposed light. Frustrated, you spot meter the moon and adjust your camera’s settings. Now you have a shot where you can actually see a couple of craters, but everything around the moon is pitch black.
Obviously, there’s a secret or two to getting great shots of the moon. I’m going to tell you what they are.
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Outstanding shots of the moon

Outstanding shots of the moon

Moon photography is one of those things that doesn’t always work out the way you’d hoped it would. In fact, unless you are well versed in the art of moon photography, it probably hardly ever works out the way you’d hoped. But take heart, it is possible to get a great moon shot with just a tripod and a 200mm or longer lens. To include the scenery, however, you may also need to be understand the art of Photoshopping–you’ll need to combine two shots (one of the moon and one of the landscape) to get a final image that is well exposed for both parts of the scene.
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Cloudy Day? Perfect for photography!

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Cloudy Day? Perfect for photography!

Don’t let anyone tell you that you shouldn’t take photos on overcast days. Sure, cloudy days have their challenges, but they don’t call them “nature’s softbox” for nothing. Just follow a few simple tips and your cloudy day photographs will prove to those naysayers that overcast conditions really are perfect for photography.
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Outstanding Shots of Overcast Skies

Outstanding Shots of Overcast Skies

Clouds not only create a beautiful, soft, even light, they also add drama to the sky. Shooting a cloudy sky at sunrise or sunset can almost not fail to create a compelling image. If you find yourself in a beautiful setting on a cloudy day, stick around until sunset and grab a few magic hour shots of the skies as the sun goes down. That’s what these photographers did, and look at how amazing their results were.
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How to capture photos in foggy or misty conditions

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How to capture photos in foggy or misty conditions

Fog. It’s eerily beautiful, potentially dangerous and can transform almost any setting into something either ominous, or quiet, moody and introspective. It’s also notoriously difficult to photograph. Have you ever tried? This is one of those situations where you feel certain your photos are just going to take themselves. The landscape is bathed in this amazing gray mist, there’s beauty everywhere, but for some reason your photos fail to recreate what your eyes see. Why?

The answer, as it so often and redundantly is in photography, is light.
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Outstanding Shots of Fog and Mist

Outstanding Shots of Fog and Mist

Foggy scenes are ethereally beautiful and seem like they ought to just take themselves. But fog is tricky–it can sap contrast and color, which may result in images that look flat and dimensionless. Don’t give up though–try putting something in the foreground, or try focusing on those beautiful foggy day light rays. And check out this list of outstanding foggy day images to see what really works for these challenging shoots.
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16 Tips for Better Landscapes

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16 Tips for Better Landscapes

To the snap-shooter, nothing could be simpler than a landscape. Just find some pretty scenery, lift your camera and press the button. Viola! Landscape.

Now if you’re not a mere snap-shooter, you know the absolute folly of what I just said. While it’s true that it’s easy to shoot a landscape, it is also extremely difficult to capture one. What I mean of course is that anyone can lift a camera and press the button, and because landscapes don’t move it seems as if capturing one should be as easy as that. But you and I both know that recreating a beautiful, three-dimensional scene in a two dimensional medium is much more difficult than just hitting that shutter button. Let’s see how to do it…
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26 Outstanding Landscapes

26 Outstanding Landscapes

Landscape photography is one of the most popular branches of photography, and also one of the most difficult to master. Landscapes are vast, and photographs are not. It is the landscape photographer’s job to recreate that sense of enormity onto a flat, small-scale medium. This may sound daunting, but there are a lot of tricks you can use to help bring your landscapes to life. Remember to include a foreground, for example, and try using compositional techniques such as converging lines and overlapping objects. And look at the work of other photographers for inspiration, too. Here are a few to get you started.
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Capturing Compelling Forest Photos

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Capturing Compelling Forest Photos

Line is one of those compositional elements that can really make a photograph. That’s why it’s one of the six classic design elements – line can create emotion and a sense of depth. It can be the difference between a good photo and a great one.

That’s why a well-composed shot of a forest is almost always going to be a great photo. There are lines everywhere in a forest, particularly vertical lines. Vertical lines convey as sense of power and strength. They can give your viewer a sense of spirituality, majesty, wonder and infinite height. If you’re looking for a subject that can convey emotion even without the presence of human beings, this is the one.
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How to take a Perfect Panoramic Photograph

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How to take a Perfect Panoramic Photograph

Today’s point and shoot cameras have a ton of bells and whistles. If you own one of these little cameras, you may not even be aware of all of those fancy features. In fact you may be surprised to discover that your little point and shoot (or phone camera) is capable of some things that your DSLR isn’t. One of the most widely under-utilized bells (or maybe whistles) that point and shoot camera have is the panoramic mode. While you certainly can take panoramic images using a camera without this feature, it does make these shots infinitely simpler.

But what if you don’t have one of these cameras? Let’s see how to take images appropriate for panoramas, and how to stitch them together.
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How To: Using a Circular Polarizer

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How To: Using a Circular Polarizer

Modern digital cameras are capable of transforming almost any scene from ordinary to extraordinary. With the right tools and the right knowledge, you can actually create an image that is even more impressive than the scene you saw with your naked eye. Your camera’s settings are designed to help you achieve this, as are software packages such as Photoshop Elements. You can also use any of dozens of little tools and tricks to add that little bit of interest to your image that can go a long way towards transforming your photos from plain to amazing.

One of the most important of these tools is the circular polarizer. A circular polarizer is a screw-on filter that could almost be described as a pair of sunglasses for your lens.
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Infrared Photography

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Infrared Photography

If you’ve studied and practised photography for long enough, you know that a great photo is one that gives the viewer a unique perspective on the world. That can be done in many different ways–by choosing a unique subject, by taking the photo from an unusual vantage point, by carefully selecting depth of field or shutter speed, or by experimenting with camera equipment such as filters and special lenses.

One way to almost guarantee a photo will make people stop and take notice is to try your hand at infrared photography. Now, if you’ve ever spent time watching scary movies you’ve probably already seen infrared in action – apparently that’s one way to spot a ghost – but you may not be familiar with using infrared (IR) to capture less frightening scenes, such as landscapes. And you don’t have to go shopping at the Catch-A-Ghost Emporium either, nor do you have to spend a truckload of money on high tech equipment. You can start capturing great IR photos, in fact, for around 100 bucks – with the understanding of course that if you get hooked on it you might want to make further investments.
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Photographing Seascapes

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Photographing Seascapes

Nothing inspires that inner photographer quite like the ocean. The crashing surf, those sailboats on the horizon, seabirds cruising just above the water – it would be a crime not to overshoot such a scene. So how come the photos you take home from the beach sometimes just don’t manage to capture the drama and beauty of the ocean?

The answer of course is dimension, just like it is in so many other landscapes. The ocean is three dimensional and a photograph is not. To capture the full beauty of the ocean you must somehow also capture that sense of depth. But that’s not all – ocean photography is all about timing, too, and finding just the right time and just the right beach is the key to a great seascape.
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