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Tag: Light

What is Light Painting?

Filed in Tips by on April 18, 2014 0 Comments
What is Light Painting?

Have you ever seen one of those wedding pictures where the happy newlyweds used sparklers to spell out their date? This is called light painting. Light painting is the use of a slow shutter speed and a light source to create or enhance a photograph. This process allows you to use light in a similar manner as you would a paint brush. Using your camera and a light source, you can create a completely new photograph or add emphasis to an established scene. Here’s all the light painting information you need to illuminate yourself.
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How to Photograph the Moon

Filed in Tips by on March 28, 2014 1 Comment
How to Photograph the Moon

OK, raise your hand if this has happened to you. You’re sitting around on your deck or maybe you’re inside doing something, and suddenly you notice through the trees or through your front window that the moon has just come up, and it’s HUGE. The scenery around the moon is picturesque–maybe it’s beautiful trees still lit by the last light from the sunset. Or maybe it’s the skyline of the city where you live. Wow, you think, that would make an awesome picture. You grab your DSLR and go outside to find the perfect vantage point. You frame your shot, take the picture, and viola! A tiny, featureless, glowing ball of overexposed light. Frustrated, you spot meter the moon and adjust your camera’s settings. Now you have a shot where you can actually see a couple of craters, but everything around the moon is pitch black.
Obviously, there’s a secret or two to getting great shots of the moon. I’m going to tell you what they are.
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Outstanding shots of the moon

Filed in Gallery by on March 28, 2014 2 Comments
Outstanding shots of the moon

Moon photography is one of those things that doesn’t always work out the way you’d hoped it would. In fact, unless you are well versed in the art of moon photography, it probably hardly ever works out the way you’d hoped. But take heart, it is possible to get a great moon shot with just a tripod and a 200mm or longer lens. To include the scenery, however, you may also need to be understand the art of Photoshopping–you’ll need to combine two shots (one of the moon and one of the landscape) to get a final image that is well exposed for both parts of the scene.
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9 Tips for Lifestyle Photography

Filed in Tips by on March 15, 2014 0 Comments
9 Tips for Lifestyle Photography

Often times, the photographs we feel the most connected to are simple. They freeze time, a moment as it is, instead of the contrived editorial work of fashion shoots and perfume ads. Babies sitting on a shiny hardwood floor, kids in an intense game of flag football, this season’s first snowfall. These photos are so easy to connect with because they are honest portrayals of life. This is called lifestyle photography. Lifestyle photography is a genre of photography which serves the purpose of documenting life honestly and artistically by capturing authentic, usually candid moments as they happen. What that actually translates to in regards to actual photographs depends on you the photographer and your artistic vision.
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How To Shoot Photos in the Dark

Filed in Tips by on February 15, 2014 6 Comments
How To Shoot Photos in the Dark

Light! It’s the single most important element in any photograph. Without light, you’ve got no image. Without the right light, you’ve got a bad image. In photography, light is everything.

And with that in mind, I’m going to tell you how to shoot photos in the dark.

But wait, didn’t you just say that light is everything? Yes, I did. And the reason that you can still take great photos in the dark is because – with the possible exception of a very deep cave or a crevasse at the bottom of the ocean – there’s really no such thing as “dark” here on Earth.
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Improving your Mountain Photography

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Improving your Mountain Photography

Perhaps nothing is more breathtaking than a mountain. Snowy peaks in the winter, flowery slopes in the summer, a mountain looks majestic no matter what the season. So why do some mountain photos look, well, un-majestic?

The trouble with mountains is precisely that they are majestic. We are used to feeling awed in the presence of a mountain – their size makes us feel small, overwhelmed and sometimes insignificant. The fresh air makes us feel invigorated. The smells make us feel like we’re a part of the landscape and in tune with the seasons. But a photograph of the mountains lacks all these external stimuli. Unless your photo is printed at, say, 24,000″x48,000″, your viewer isn’t going to have that feeling of being overwhelmed by size. And unless your image is scratch-n-sniff, you won’t be able to recreate any of the smells, either. And the fresh air, well, I suppose you could have your viewer look at the picture while standing in front of a mountain, but that would kind of defeat the purpose, wouldn’t it?

So how do you make a mountain photo look as majestic as the mountain itself? You have to know the tricks.
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How To Choose an Aperture to Control Depth of Field

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How To Choose an Aperture to Control Depth of Field

If you own a camera, you’ve probably at least heard the term “aperture.” But your understanding of what that means may depend a lot on what kind of camera you own, and how you use it. Today, I’ll explain exactly how the aperture setting affects your images, and what aperture settings to use in which situations.
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Using a Reflector to Soften Hard Light

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Using a Reflector to Soften Hard Light

You know all about the “golden hour”, that hour after sunrise and before sunset, when the light is beautiful and soft. Photographers dream of this light that flatters their subject and makes their work look like a million bucks. Now back to reality. What about that afternoon birthday party you booked, or your own child’s first steps on the beach at midday? There are always occasions when you are forced to shoot in less than ideal lighting situations. The harsh, midday light casts shadows and makes your job as a photographer more difficult, but you can still get great pictures even when it is bright outside. If you are doing a lot of portrait photography, just add a simple, relatively inexpensive tool to your kit – the reflector (and maybe a personal assistant to go with it)!
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Soft Light in Portrait Photography

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Soft Light in Portrait Photography

There are lots of things to think about when taking a portrait. You have your camera settings to worry about, the composition of the photo, and last but certainly not least the lighting. The lighting and how you position your subject with respect to the light dramatically changes the look and quality of your pictures. In some cases you may, for artistic reasons, choose hard light that casts dramatic shadows. However, if you are taking more of a standard portrait and want a beautiful result, soft light is key. Read on for tips and tricks to using soft light both outdoors and in.
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Taking Awesome Group Photos

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Taking Awesome Group Photos

We can’t avoid taking pictures of groups. They are part of every company picnic, Sunday night family dinner, and school picture day. They are also the first pictures pulled out when everyone in hunched over the photo album, reminiscing about all the fond memories associated with family gatherings and nights out with friends. While they are a common part of our lives as people and artists, they can sometimes be stressful to pull off and difficult to do well. Here are seven tips to help you achieve the best possible results.
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16 Tips for Better Landscapes

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16 Tips for Better Landscapes

To the snap-shooter, nothing could be simpler than a landscape. Just find some pretty scenery, lift your camera and press the button. Viola! Landscape.

Now if you’re not a mere snap-shooter, you know the absolute folly of what I just said. While it’s true that it’s easy to shoot a landscape, it is also extremely difficult to capture one. What I mean of course is that anyone can lift a camera and press the button, and because landscapes don’t move it seems as if capturing one should be as easy as that. But you and I both know that recreating a beautiful, three-dimensional scene in a two dimensional medium is much more difficult than just hitting that shutter button. Let’s see how to do it…
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Dealing with Difficult Lighting Situations

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Dealing with Difficult Lighting Situations

In the Photographer’s Perfect Paradise, the golden hour would last all day long. The light would forever be soft, your subjects would never squint and raccoon eyes would simply be markings on the face of a common North American procyonid.

But alas, we do not live in a Perfect Paradise. After all, we have to get up at dark-o-clock to take advantage of that elusive morning golden hour, and neither it nor the one in the afternoon lasts as long as we need them to. And the rest of the time, the light varies from occasionally splendid to just OK, to absolutely terrible. Can you hear those tiny violins? We photographers have it tough. Painters, they have it made. They can just paint the right light. We have to wait for it to come along. Or do we?
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Tips for using Natural Light

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Tips for using Natural Light

“Light makes photography. Embrace light. Admire it. Love it. But above all, know light. Know it for all you are worth, and you will know the key to photography.”
-George Eastman

Photography is all about light. Unless you have a studio setting with lighting, for most photographers that means natural light. Your ability to observe and utilize light and adjust your subject and settings accordingly can make or break your pictures. Learning to “read” the light and use that knowledge to take beautiful pictures is truly an art that can takes years to master, but there are some simple lighting tips that even beginners can follow to improve their photos.
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How To Photograph a Rainbow

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How To Photograph a Rainbow

So you’re driving home from work one day, and your DSLR is sitting in the passenger seat next to you. It just stopped raining and the light is amazing – so amazing that you’re tempted to pull over and take a photograph. Then you see it: a real reason to stop and take a photo. A rainbow has appeared in a nearby field, just between a red barn and a couple of cows. You stop your car and lift the camera, but for some reason the rainbow looks faint – almost non-existent – in your viewfinder. You snap the photo anyway, but the rainbow looks faint on the image, too. You look up – the rainbow still looks as brilliant as it did before, but for some reason it’s avoiding your camera. What did you do wrong?
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A Primer For Photographing Glass Objects

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A Primer For Photographing Glass Objects

Intermediate If you’ve spent any time experimenting with studio lighting, you can probably guess (or maybe you know from first-hand experience) how challenging it is to shoot photos of glass objects. Glass has a highly reflective surface, which means that you can’t light it the same way you light other subjects. But if you really want to develop an understanding of light and how to work with it, this is a challenge I urge you to undertake, and to keep working at until you get some good results. The ability to shoot glass objects well is a skill that will also help you in your other photographic pursuits.
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