•  

Tag: macro

Pros and Cons of Extension Tubes

Filed in Tips by 3 Comments
Pros and Cons of Extension Tubes

Do you want to take extreme close-ups? Whether it is flowers, insects, coins, or any other variety of things, how can you get closer focus than your lens alone allows? I have discussed other aspects of macro photography in previous articles. This photography niche is fun to explore but is very expensive if you purchase a macro lens. There are other options like using a close up lens or lens reversal tricks, but there is also a simple addition to your camera equipment called an extension tube. Read on for the pros and cons of this option.
Continue Reading »

Outstanding Insect and Spider Photographs

Outstanding Insect and Spider Photographs

Don’t fear them–photograph them! Bugs and spiders make fascinating subjects for any macro photographer. Once you’ve got a few great shots of these amazing little creatures in your portfolio, you may never go back to photographing inanimate subjects. Taking photos of spiders and insects gives you a close-up look at a world you might otherwise never see, and that can be a little addictive.
Continue Reading »

A Guide to Extension Tubes

Filed in Tips by 0 Comments
A Guide to Extension Tubes

If you are anything like me, you often find yourself marveling at the beauty of macro photography. Dew drops on flower petals, butterfly wings and the inner workings of a pocket watch up close create a sense of wonder that can’t be found elsewhere. You’ve also probably lamented at the cost of a dedicated macro lens and have a hard time justifying the cost. Good news, there is an alternative called an extension tube.

An extension tube is a component that fits between your lens and your camera body. It looks like a lens, except its missing one typically important component, the glass. Don’t worry, it’s not a mistake. These hollow tubes, made of plastic or metal, are created for the purpose of moving your lens farther away from the internal sensor located inside your camera body. Doing this allows you to get closer to whatever you are photographing, increasing the magnification.
Continue Reading »

Photographing Small Animals

Filed in Tips by 1 Comment
Photographing Small Animals

We have all seen them – images like the ones in a National Geographic spread of oversized fly eye balls or gorgeous butterflies. The kind of photos that make you stop and marvel. Are you interested in taking close-up photographs? Do you like nature and want to learn how to photograph it? Small animals are a great place to start for someone that appreciates detail and beauty and doesn’t mind getting down and dirty a bit.

Let me be clear that by small animals I mean really small. I’m not talking hamsters and bunnies but snails and insects. Those critters that can go unnoticed but are everywhere and have unique beauty particularly when photographed close up. The beauty of starting with small animals is that you don’t need to go on an exotic safari; your subjects are in backyards and parks all over the world. It is amazing what you can discover when you get down and view the world from the perspective of a bug! Read on to learn about this field of photography that opens up a whole world of tiny subjects to be photographed!
Continue Reading »

How to Photograph Water Droplets

Filed in Tips by 4 Comments
How to Photograph Water Droplets

Cameras are excellent at capturing moments in time. But besides just capturing babies in their full, unbridled cuteness, cameras can also capture moments in time that we don’t even notice. One example is whisps of smoke just before they vanish into the air. Another is falling drops of water.
Continue Reading »

Five Surprising Uses for your Camera’s Self-Timer

Filed in Tips by 0 Comments
Five Surprising Uses for your Camera’s Self-Timer

Most modern cameras have a self-timer feature. You might know this feature best as that setting that allows you to actually be in the photo as well as your subjects. This is particularly great for photogra-moms and/or photogra-dads. You know, the person in your family who is always behind the camera and never in the photo. The person who, as a result, is so absent from the family album that viewers wonder if she or he actually comes along on any of those family outings.

Self timers are great for those family photographers because they allow the person behind the camera to get in front of the camera. But did you know self-timers have other uses too?
Continue Reading »

5 Tips for Improving Your Flower Photos

Filed in Tips by 1 Comment
5 Tips for Improving Your Flower Photos

It’s amazing how many photographers start out by photographing flowers. If you think about it, though, it makes sense. They’re beautiful, usually easy to access except in winter months (and even then, that depends on where you live), and unless it’s windy, they pose quite nicely for you. Add to all of that, each one can be unique and special lighting can enhance them in ways that aren’t apparent to the naked eye, only through the lens and specific settings and processing.

But flower shots can tend to look the same. So today, I’ll give you a few tricks and techniques to get you on your way to capturing some compelling flower images.
Continue Reading »

7 Tips for How to Take Close Up Photos of Nature

Filed in Tips by 1 Comment
7 Tips for How to Take Close Up Photos of Nature

Considering the billions of photographs out there, few of them have the tendency to stop us in our tracks and to really observe them the way close up nature photos do. There’s something compelling about the details in a micro world that isn’t always visible to the eye. There’s something awe inspiring about seeing a landscape image… the big view. But with macro photography, it’s as though we have zoomed in with a microscope or magnifying glass on a landscape photo to view the finite details.

Nature calendars are top sellers each year because of their inherent beauty that draws us in to a world that allows us to escape our own. From roaring oceans to rambling brooks to flower laden meadows nature inspires us to not only photograph it, but to observe it. As photographers, we’re lucky to find ourselves out there amongst the trees and fields and rivers finding something, almost anything, that captures our eye and lens.

This draw to nature doesn’t mean that it comes easy to photograph. It can be quite simple at times, but there are still tips worth noting, and that’s what I’m about to provide you with.
Continue Reading »

Photographing Mushrooms

Filed in Tips by 4 Comments
Photographing Mushrooms

“Fungal photography.” That’s like viral photography, right? Only slower moving and … itchier. Actually, no. “Fungal photography” is the quite literal term used to describe what for many people is a passion – photographing mushrooms. You won’t find much glamour in this little corner of the photography world. Mushroom photography can be dirty – like a growing in dung kind of dirty – and since mushrooms prefer damp, cool places seeking them out can sometimes be a miserable endeavor. But viewed through a camera lens when the light is just right, a mushroom can have beauty that goes far beyond those still-dirty button mushrooms and portobellos you find in your supermarket. Finding and shooting mushrooms can be a great challenge both physically and artistically, which, of course, is why you should do it.
Continue Reading »

How To Take Memorable Photos

Filed in Tips by 5 Comments
How To Take Memorable Photos

Quick, think back on all the photos you’ve seen in your life. What, you can’t remember them all? You can’t even remember most of them? So which ones do you remember? Chances are, there are a few that immediately come to mind. How about Raising the flag on Iwo Jima, by Joe Rosenthal? Or Afghan Girl by Steve McCurry, or Lunch Atop a Skyscraper by Charles C. Ebbets? And now that you can name a handful of unforgettable images, can you put your finger on what it is that makes them so unforgettable?

Not all photos are memorable. In fact, most photos aren’t memorable. Just cruise through Flickr or some other photo sharing service and then quiz yourself 15 minutes later about what you saw. How many photos do you think you’ll be able to describe from memory? One or two? Any at all?

As a photographer, you want your photos to be memorable. It’s probably the main reason why you take photos in the first place – either because you want to preserve your own memories, or because you want to create art that someone else will remember. So creating images that will remain in your viewer’s mind long after he looks the other way is quite possibly the most important photography challenge you face. Let’s see how…
Continue Reading »

Macro Lenses

Filed in Tips by 4 Comments
Macro Lenses

You’d think it would be easy to find a bug or a small flower and zoom right in and photograph it. That is until you try it. Macro photography is trickier than most would think. If you want to gain those magnificent results that go with it, you need to know what you’re doing. Macro photos have a way of taking a finite world and magnifying it to a grand level that captures your attention. Quite different from landscape photography’s broad scope, it tends to amaze viewers in different ways. This photo of the frog, captured with a 100mm macro lens, is a great example of a macro photograph that makes you want to go hangout on a lily pad! For the best macro results, follow some of these guidelines.
Continue Reading »

Visual Design: Enhancing Your Photography With Patterns

Filed in Tips by 1 Comment
Visual Design: Enhancing Your Photography With Patterns

Nothing could be more appealing than repetition. You know, like when your coworker tells you the same joke 25 times or when your preschooler won’t stop making monkey noises. Yeah, I know. Neither one of those things is really all that appealing, but trust me when I say photography is different. Visual artists in general, in fact, recognize the value of pattern in creating a visually interesting composition. Remember pop-artist Andy Warhol’s repeating cans of soup? Love it or hate it, you still had to stop and look at it. (Or recreate it!) That’s the power of pattern.
Continue Reading »

Adding Dew Drops to Enhance a Macro Photograph

Filed in Tips by 4 Comments
Adding Dew Drops to Enhance a Macro Photograph

If you look at two macro photographs of the same flower, leaf, or spider web and the only difference is that one has a dew drop on it and the other doesn’t, the dew drop photo will be favored every time. That small bit of water adds so much to an image between light and reflection that it always draws the eye in to examine it a bit closer. It seems like photographers who capture these images are out there after every rainstorm waiting for the perfect light and drops to complete their nature image. Are they really wearing their galoshes and trekking through mud to find the right flower sprinkled in dew? Some might be, but I assure you, many are not. So, what’s the trick up their photo-sleeve? Read on.
Continue Reading »

Taking Perfect Pictures of Plants

Filed in Tips by 3 Comments
Taking Perfect Pictures of Plants

If your last photo shoot was at a zoo or a kid’s birthday party, you might be tired of moving subjects. Don’t worry, every photographer eventually wearies of shooting subjects who turn their butts towards you at the last second (zoos) or who have cake all over their faces (birthday parties). It’s time to relax and schedule a photo shoot with that most immobile and cooperative of subjects: Plants.
Continue Reading »

3 Things Macro Photography Can Teach You About Taking Portraits

Filed in Tips by 3 Comments
3 Things Macro Photography Can Teach You About Taking Portraits

Over the years, I’ve learned that a lot of photography skills bleed into other areas. If you learn about action photography, it’ll help you learn how to take pictures of waterfalls. If you know how to photograph snow, you’ll probably be good at photographing sand. Another example is macro photography. Very few people know that macro photography is a primer for taking perfect portraits. How so? Here are a few reasons why.
Continue Reading »