•  

Tag: shutter speed

Ask David: What camera settings should I use on a sunny day?

Ask David: What camera settings should I use on a sunny day?

When you are photographing during the sunniest part of the day you are combating two major issues: The first is overexposure and the second is harsh shadows.

First, let’s tackle overexposure. Overexposure occurs when too much light gets into your camera and washes out your photo. To combat overexposure, it’s best to shoot in full manual mode because it will give you the most control. As you adjust each setting, keep an eye on your light meter. It’s going to give you a ballpark as you change your settings and will be your first indication if your shot is going be overexposed.
Continue Reading »

8 Ways to Steady Your Camera Without A Tripod

Filed in Tips by 5 Comments
8 Ways to Steady Your Camera Without A Tripod

“You should have shot that with a tripod.”

Ah, those hated words. They’re meant to be helpful, they really are. But it’s advice that doesn’t always mean anything, because sometimes you just can’t shoot with a tripod. So what do you do? Here are 8 ways to steady your camera if you don’t have a tripod handy.
Continue Reading »

Cloudy Day? Perfect for photography!

Filed in Tips by 0 Comments
Cloudy Day? Perfect for photography!

Don’t let anyone tell you that you shouldn’t take photos on overcast days. Sure, cloudy days have their challenges, but they don’t call them “nature’s softbox” for nothing. Just follow a few simple tips and your cloudy day photographs will prove to those naysayers that overcast conditions really are perfect for photography.
Continue Reading »

13 Tips for Inspired Concert Photography

Filed in Tips by 1 Comment
13 Tips for Inspired Concert Photography

Concerts are a symbiotic experience, each one unique to the music, the musicians, and the audience. The reciprocal nature appeals to us on a visceral level. It’s a way to connect with people over a shared interest and at times, a shared adrenaline rush. Of course, it is then natural, to want to capture the natural high only found when your heart is in sync with the bass drum. As photographers our first instinct is to bring the camera along and take the experience home with us in the form of photographs. Concert photography is a particularly difficult medium because of the varied and rapidly changing lighting situations, masses of people, and quickly moving musicians. Here are the basics for concert photography that will live up to your memories.
Continue Reading »

Mastering Panning: Photographing Moving Subjects

Filed in Tips by 3 Comments
Mastering Panning:  Photographing Moving Subjects

I am just going to lay this out there right from the get go: panning is not easy! You must be willing to experiment to master this technique. What is panning, you ask? Well, simply put panning is a technique in which you move your camera along in the same direction and speed as the moving object you are photographing. The result is a relatively clear, focused subject with a blurred background. This is different from simply using a slow shutter speed to create motion blur because the subject itself is in focus. Slow shutter speed is key though, so muster up some patience and read on to find out about this cool technique.
Continue Reading »

How Shutter Speed Affects Your Photos

Filed in Tips by 3 Comments
How Shutter Speed Affects Your Photos

Now that you’ve got a pretty good handle on your camera’s scene modes, you’re also starting to develop an understanding of the basic principles of photography – the ones that are going to take you from the land of snapshots to the land of technical excellence. You’ve already seen these principles in action, now it’s just time to define them and look at how you can fine tune them to create the images you want.
Continue Reading »

Camera Shake: Not Just For Deleting Anymore

Filed in Tips by 0 Comments
Camera Shake: Not Just For Deleting Anymore

Modern photographers love to push the envelope of all those old-school philosophies. Lens flare? Love it. Severe overexposure? Kind of cool. Camera shake? Awesome.

Wait, camera shake? Isn’t that the reason why you bought that oh-so expensive but light, sturdy and portable tripod? So you could avoid camera shake?

Let me backtrack just a second. Camera shake is still mostly bad, most of the time. You don’t want camera shake messing up your long-exposure landscape image or that fabulous photo of the spinning fairground ride. You don’t want it to mess up the clarity of any image that you intended to be, well, clear. But there are certain instances where camera shake can be used for creative effect. Most of the time (but not all the time) this is an intentional decision on the part of you, the photographer. So when is camera shake actually a good thing?
Continue Reading »

How To Choose an Aperture to Control Depth of Field

Filed in Tips by 4 Comments
How To Choose an Aperture to Control Depth of Field

If you own a camera, you’ve probably at least heard the term “aperture.” But your understanding of what that means may depend a lot on what kind of camera you own, and how you use it. Today, I’ll explain exactly how the aperture setting affects your images, and what aperture settings to use in which situations.
Continue Reading »

Tips for Great Candlelight Photography

Filed in Tips by 4 Comments
Tips for Great Candlelight Photography

Want to create a romantic or dramatic mood in your next photo? Try candlelight as a lighting choice. Candle lit photos are absolutely beautiful when taken correctly. As this is a low light situation, there are some tricks to make sure your photos are correctly exposed. Read on for some tricks for taking great photos by candlelight.
Continue Reading »

How To: Toss your Camera

Filed in Tips by 1 Comment
How To: Toss your Camera

OK, first of all, don’t try this. There. Now I’ll tell you how to try the thing you’re not going to try. It’s camera tossing, and it can create some really cool, abstract images. And also destroy your camera. So don’t do it, seriously. Unless you want to. But please keep in mind that I told you not to.

Yes, camera tossing is something that should be done at your own risk, because it’s exactly what it sounds like. You’re going to take your camera and throw it into the air, and then hopefully catch it again. This can (and probably will, if you do it enough times) cause great damage to your camera, but the results might be worth it.
Continue Reading »

Motion Blur Photography

Filed in Tips by 2 Comments
Motion Blur Photography

Every photographer knows the anguish of a photo that’s been messed up by motion blur. It happens to all of us – you’re trying to shoot a soccer game at dusk, and as it gets darker your aperture gets wider and your shutter speed gets slower. Finally, you capture that trick shot your son has been practicing all season and, dang. Motion blur. Your soccer star’s feet don’t show clearly, and the background is a mess. The ball looks kind of cool, though.

Ah ha! That’s the part you have to hang on to. The ball looks kind of cool. And motion blur photographs can be really cool, if you shoot them correctly, with purpose, and if you shoot a lot of them.
Continue Reading »

Tips For Long Exposure Photography

Filed in Tips by 4 Comments
Tips For Long Exposure Photography

Long exposure photography is something most hobbyists have tried at some point or another. Slow shutter speeds are necessary, after all, for capturing flash-free images after dark. But long exposures aren’t just for low light. Those surreal-looking photos of streaky skies and misty waters are long exposures, too. Let’s see how to take them!
Continue Reading »

Photographing Air Shows

Filed in Tips by 0 Comments
Photographing Air Shows

It’s air show season in the US, and that means hot weather, high-decibel noise and a whole bunch of hazy photos of tiny little specs in the sky.

Air show photography is tough! Unless you’re in an airplane looking down at the performers, it can be difficult to get a great shot at an air show. But don’t worry, you don’t have to leave that camera at home. There are plenty of things you can do to get the most out of your air show visit.
Continue Reading »

How to Photograph Hummingbirds

Filed in Tips by 3 Comments
How to Photograph Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds are amazing creatures. Besides being colorful and often iridescent, hummingbirds are also unique compared to other birds. Depending on the species, a hummingbird’s wings move between 12 and 80 times per second (imagine trying to do that with your arms). They can fly forwards and backwards and can reach speeds up to 34 miles per hour. The smallest living species of bird is the bee hummingbird, which measures just 2 to 2 1/2 inches long and weighs less than 1/10th of an ounce.

So is it any wonder that photographers are drawn to these birds? Fortunately, with the right equipment and a little bit of knowledge about these tiny subjects, almost anyone can photograph a hummingbird.
Continue Reading »

Photographing the Sea

Filed in Tips by 7 Comments
Photographing the Sea

One of the most dramatic subjects for your lens is the sea. It’s calm, powerful, seemingly endless, and ever changing depending on the lighting. With all those characteristics, you want to ensure that your trip to the sea with your camera pays off, so I put together a few tips of ideas you may not have thought of… so, pack your sunblock and beach towel.
Continue Reading »