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Tag: sports photography

Ask David: The scourge of photography: Blurry Images

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Ask David: The scourge of photography: Blurry Images

Has this happened to you? You pack up your camera and go to a football game. It’s a great game, and you’re sure you’re capturing some fabulous images. You’ve got a perfect, clear view of the field, a good telephoto lens and shots of all the best moments. When you arrive home, you can’t wait to see what you’ve got. You load the memory card up on your computer and you open up your photos in Photoshop and…

They’re all blurry. Every single one of them. What happened?
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Back Button Focusing For Tack Sharp Focus

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Back Button Focusing For Tack Sharp Focus

We are all on the quest for those tack sharp photographs. We spend thousands of dollars on new high end glass and upgrade our camera bodies annually seeking out those extra megapixels. What if I told you there is something you could be doing right now that would increase the clarity of your photos for free? No, I’m not joking. I’m talking about back-button focusing.
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High Burst Rate Explained

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High Burst Rate Explained

Have you ever attempted to take photos of a fast moving subject and failed miserably? Sometimes the moment you release the shutter is not quite the moment you actually wanted to capture. An advantage of a DSLR over a point and shoot is the quick reaction of the shutter to your finger. Even with responsive shutter release it is not always quick or timely enough to get the most important shot. You may snap away only to realize you barely missed the game winning goal. Wouldn’t it be nice to increase your odds of getting a great shot? Using high burst rate mode is a way to take multiple shots with one push of a button, improving your odds of nailing it.
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Continuous Focus Mode

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Continuous Focus Mode

Getting the action shot can be difficult. It goes without saying (but I’ll say it anyway) that it is typically harder to take a great photo of a moving subject than a stationary one. It’s the bottom of the 9th and you snap a picture just as your son steals home for the win. You may think your shot is a winner only to find your son is actually a blur, and you didn’t really capture the moment like you hoped. You can switch solely to landscape shots or take up tortoise photography, or you can learn how to photograph a moving target more effectively. There is a simple change you can make to your auto focus settings to do just that.
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Beach photography

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Beach photography

If seascapes are about nature, then beach photos are about people. I don’t have to tell you that your approach to each of these subjects is going to be very different. When shooting the water, rocks and the shoreline in general, you want to communicate a mood of tranquillity and beauty, or perhaps even one of ferocity, depending of course on the weather. But when you’re shooting the beach on a sunny day, you’ve got a very different mood to capture. Summer fun, family time, youth, sports and recreation – you’re going to need to tempo up a little and change your perspective. Here are a few tips for getting the most out of those beach photos.
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Photographing Horses

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Photographing Horses

Taking pictures of animals is both fun and challenging, so it’s no wonder that Flickr, Facebook and every other photo sharing website out there are full of images of everything from family pets to wild animals to the residents of the local zoo.

If you’ve ever spent any time photographing animals, you know that different species require different tricks. Cats, for example, need to be stalked. Cats are like teenagers – if they know that camera is around, they’ll avoid it. Dogs, on the other hand, tend to be more accommodating than cats. Spend a few minutes throwing a stick for an active dog, and you’ll probably come away from the experience with a few good photos.

Now what about horses? Ah, they’re even trickier. Our canine and feline friends are carnivores, but horses are prey animals, so their behavior is very different from the behavior of our household pets. Photographing horses requires some altogether different tricks.
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5 Tips for Photographing Extreme Sports

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5 Tips for Photographing Extreme Sports

Whether they’re coming off a ramp made of snow or concrete or hanging at hundreds of feet in the air, extreme sport athletes are fun to watch. Flying through the air, twirling, or landing the stunt, the crowds are engaged and photographers are clicking away hoping to catch that great shot for their portfolio. Whether you’ve tried to capture these action seeking subjects before or not, these tips on how to do it are sure to inform you; but at the very least I hope to inspire you to get out there and try it.
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3 Lens Kits For 3 Types Of Photographer

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3 Lens Kits For 3 Types Of Photographer

The big selling point with digital SLRs is the ability to swap out the lens. Whether you are new to owning a digital SLR, or you’re simply considering a purchase, a lot of photographers want to know how many lenses they’ll actually need to buy. It’s an important thing to consider. After all, the true cost of digital SLR ownership isn’t in the camera body alone. It’s in all of the other gear that comes along with it. I want to show you some common kits a lot of photographers end up getting.
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Ask David: Bridge Camera or Digital SLR?

Ask David: Bridge Camera or Digital SLR?

This week’s Ask David question comes from Ernie Everest. He’s an avid photographer looking to upgrade his point-and-shoot setup to something with a little more power. He wonders why people purchase digital SLRs when there are a lot of cheaper and lighter solutions.
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Digital Camera Modes – Scene Modes

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Digital Camera Modes – Scene Modes

Your digital camera comes equipped with an arsenal of automatic and semi-automatic modes designed to make your life as a photographer easier. Aside from the fully automatic mode, aperture priority mode, and shutter priority mode, your camera gives you a variety of scene-specific modes. Each mode has a specific purpose. You can easily switch between modes for portraits, landscapes, macro photography, sunset photography, and more. In this article, you’ll get a behind the scenes look at what your camera does when you work with one of its many automatic scene modes.
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How to use trap focus to get better sports and wildlife shots

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How to use trap focus to get better sports and wildlife shots

Before I start this tip, I should mention that trap focus mode is only available on digital SLR camera models. It is an advanced feature that will take a little technical expertise to master, but once you figure it out, it will improve your accuracy when you’re taking pictures of moving subjects. Trap focus mode is currently available on most digital SLRs, even if it isn’t advertised as such. Let’s have a look.
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Your Camera’s Settings: Shutter Priority Mode

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Your Camera’s Settings: Shutter Priority Mode

Your camera has many automatic modes to make your life as a photographer a little easier. Each of these automatic modes was designed to isolate one or two of the many variables and settings you’ll encounter while taking pictures. Today, we’re going to look at Shutter Priority Mode, an automatic mode that isolates the shutter speed setting. You’ll learn how to use this mode to take anything from action sequences to unbelievably smooth images of flowing waterfalls. I’ll show you the secret to getting the most out of your camera’s shutter priority mode.
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Ask David: Continuous shooting mode only takes 5 shots and then starts to buffer. Why?

Ask David: Continuous shooting mode only takes 5 shots and then starts to buffer. Why?

This week’s “Ask David” question comes from Dean Sheard. He’s a big fan of action photography, but whenever he sets his camera to continuous shooting mode, it only takes five pictures before it starts “buffering.” What’s going on here? Can he do anything to take more pictures, or is he stuck in limbo between his camera’s image sensor and his memory card (the digital equivalent of a rock and a hard place)?
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What Do Your Camera’s Different Drive Modes Do?

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What Do Your Camera’s Different Drive Modes Do?

On most cameras, when you press the shutter button, you get one picture. That’s usually the default setting, and it does the job for amateur photographers. But once you want to capture long sequences of action or take a self-portrait, you need to switch to a different drive mode. Your camera’s drive modes control the rate at which pictures are taken. In this article, we’ll show you how to use them to achieve the effects you want.
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Photo Critique: Macro on a Point-And-Shoot

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Photo Critique: Macro on a Point-And-Shoot

With as much discussion as we have been having about the difference between point-and-shoot cameras and DSLRs lately, it is only appropriate to continue our theme and explore some more pictures you can easily take with a point-and-shoot camera. A lot of people think that because they do not have a macro lens mounted on a DSLR, they can’t take good macro photos. This simply isn’t true. If you have a miniature tripod and an eye for framing your shot, you can create some amazing macro photos without owning a macro-specific lens.
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